Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

this code:

<?php

session_name('sess1');
session_start();
$_SESSION['a']=1;
session_write_close();

session_name('sess2');
session_start();
$_SESSION['b']=2;
session_write_close();

session_name('sess1');
session_start();

echo '<pre>';
print_r($_SESSION);
echo '</pre>';

?>

prints:

Array
(
    [a] => 1
    [b] => 2
)

as u see, both vars r stored in the first session (file).

i needed and expected another behavior. i need two distinct sessions.

why php behaves so? isn't it a bug?

share|improve this question
1  
It's almost certain that you don't need two distinct sessions. Tell us what you are trying to do. –  Jon Mar 19 '13 at 16:23
    
i developed a register and login system that has its own session (indeed the session contents r encrypted transparently). i want others can include it in their programs without interfering with their own sessions. also my session has its own settings (like cookie_lifetime) that i don't want to interfere with the sessions of other programs that use my system. –  H M Mar 19 '13 at 16:29
    
I don't think it's a bug, you write in the same session both times. And you then read from that session. session_name($session_name) update the name, it doesn't create a new one. –  codea Mar 19 '13 at 16:34

1 Answer 1

[from comments] i want others can include it in their programs without interfering with their own sessions.

And you want to achieve that by massively interfering with the session handling …?

I don’t think this is a good idea. You will most likely be adding to the problems that users have with sessions anyway when you go such an “unorthodox” way of playing with sessions.

also my session has its own settings (like cookie_lifetime) that i don't want to interfere with the sessions of other programs that use my system.

Why should a login system that I embed into my page have a different session lifetime than the rest of what I do with my session? Makes little sense to me.

i developed a register and login system that has its own session (indeed the session contents r encrypted transparently).

If keeping your data encrypted while leaving the rest of my session as plain text is your main concern – then you can easily generate your own key in the session array, and only encrypt the data that resides under that key.

share|improve this answer
    
ok don't take the question specific to me/my scenario. if u use only session_name('sess1') in one request/page, & session_name('sess2') in another request/page, then php will create two distinct sessions each with its own session file & vars (if u want to test it, don't forget to delete any old session cookies beforehand). afaik this is an application that is used in some programs; can u say there can never be any reason for such a program to want to access to both those sessions (probably only occasionally/in specific situations) in a single request? (maybe only for reading; not writing) –  H M Mar 19 '13 at 17:01
1  
I’m not saying that there might not be any use cases where this might be nice/come in handy – but what I’m saying is, this is meddling with the “normal” way that PHP sessions work so much, that it will likely lead to complications, especially when people with probably not so much knowledge will try to embed it into existing scripts of their own. And I can see no actual harm in “sharing” one and the same session with the scripts that you are planning to have your login system integrate into. –  CBroe Mar 20 '13 at 9:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.