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While working on a JavaScript application, I came across something unexpected while using the Chrome developer tools. I have, within a function, the following block of code:

var b = bins + 1,
    selectValues = [],
    selectedPoints = [],
    n = numVals;

    while(b--){selectValues.push(0)};


    //Main selection iterator
    if (range_min == range_max){
        mainSVG.selectAll(".sim-ui-scatter-points")
            .each(function(){
                d3.select(this).call(addClass,["foo"]);
                d3.select(this).call(removeClass,["bar","foobar"])  
                });
        } else {
            do some other stuff
        });
    }

Planning on adding some functionaility with the variable n that would occur for each item inside of the .each statement, I put a breakpoint inside the .each statement using the Chrome debugger, and then asked for n in the console while the browser was paused on the breakpoint, and got back ReferenceError: n is not defined. However, if add a console.log(n) to my code, as follows:

    //Main selection iterator
    if (range_min == range_max){
        mainSVG.selectAll(".sim-ui-scatter-points")
            .each(function(){
                console.log(n)
                d3.select(this).call(addClass,["foo"]);
                d3.select(this).call(removeClass,["bar","foobar"])  
                });
        } else {
            do some other stuff
        });
    }

Not only does the code properly return n to the console, but I can ask for n in my console in the Chrome debugger, using a breakpoint on the same line as I was using before and get a correct value instead of a reference error. Why does this happen?

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2  
If the variable is not references from your closure, V8 takes the liberty to garbage-collect it (and it will be referenced when you add the log statement). See How are closures and scopes represented at run time in JavaScript or garbage collection with node.js (Not sure whether there's a better duplicate) –  Bergi Mar 19 '13 at 17:03
1  
Ah, maybe better duplicate of Debugging Revealing Module Pattern: functions not in scope until called? –  Bergi Mar 19 '13 at 17:06
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