Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an interface with properties that cannot be set:

public interface IThing
{
    string MyText { get; }
}

I have an implementation that allows the properties to be set:

public class Thing : ObservableObject, IThing
{
    private string myText = "Testing 1 2 3";

    public string MyText
    {
        get { return this.myText; }
        set
        {
            if (this.myText != value)
            {
                this.myText = value;
                this.RaisePropertyChanged("MyText");
            }
        }
    }
}

I do this so I can pass around my object by interface and other code can't change properties, but any code with the actual implementation can.

But when I have a view model with an IThing in it and bind to the properties in XAML, I find the XAML still can set my them!

What are some options for preventing this? Thanks for any help.

EDIT: Some imperfect workarounds:

  1. Make the setters in the implementing class internal. Since it just so happens that my views are in a separate assembly, XAML is not allowed to set them. But this is just a coincidence. What if my views were in the same assembly?

  2. Make another class that holds my implementing class, but does not offer the setters for all the properties. This seems like it would work, but seems annoying to have to do.

Still looking for better options.

share|improve this question
2  
dude your setter is public. I don't understand your question. Any code with access to the property via the class directly will be able to set that. –  HighCore Mar 19 '13 at 17:04
    
Yes, "Any code with access to the property via the class directly will be able to set that". But as I said, my viewmodel has the interface only. Code that uses the viewmodel CAN'T access the setter... except XAML can. –  Buzz Mar 19 '13 at 17:32
    
XAML doesn't care about the interface. Bindings are evaluated and executed in runtime, when your class is actually there with a public setter. Remove the public setter or make it protected or something. –  HighCore Mar 19 '13 at 17:33
    
Making it protected would mean only a subclass can set the property. That's not what I want. Any code referencing the implemented class should still be able to set the properties. You're close to one work around I found, which is to make it internal. Since my views happen to be defined in another assembly. But this seems to be more of a coincidental fix. –  Buzz Mar 19 '13 at 17:38
add comment

2 Answers 2

What are you actually trying to do? How you are binding it in XAML. You can set a binding mode to OneWay if you don't want XAML to update your property back.

share|improve this answer
    
Sure, OneWay binding mode can be used, but that's like passing some data to someone else's code and saying "Please don't make any changes. I know you can, because I am offering setters, but please behave nicely and just don't do it." I want to use interfaces with no setters because that is a solid contract. –  Buzz Mar 19 '13 at 17:35
add comment

You can't hide the property in your implementation since XAML can still access the properties through reflection. You would need to provide an actual implementation that has a setter with less visibility.

Alternatively use the Binding to set the Mode to OneWay.

XAML:

{Binding Path=MyText, Mode=OneWay}

ViewModel:

public class MainWindowViewModel
{
    private readonly IThing _thing = new Thing();
    public string MyText { get { return _thing.MyText; } }
}

public interface IThing
{
    string MyText { get; }
}

public class Thing : INotifyPropertyChanged, IThing
{
    private string _myText = "Testing 1 2 3";

    string IThing.MyText
    {
        get { return _myText; }
    }

    public string MyText
    {
        get { return _myText; }
        set
        {

            if (_myText != value)
            {
                _myText = value;
                OnPropertyChanged();
            }
        }
    }

    INotifyPropertyChanged
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I guess it might just be how XAML works. But it seems quite wrong to me. It should honor the contract defined by the interface I bind to, not reflect to the actual implemented objects interface. Repeating my response to "Vibhore": Sure, OneWay binding mode can be used, but that's like passing some data to someone else's code and saying "Please don't make any changes. I know you can, because I am offering setters, but please behave nicely and just don't do it." I want to use interfaces with no setters because that is a solid contract. –  Buzz Mar 19 '13 at 17:40
    
Are you using IThing as your data context? How are you binding to it? –  Romoku Mar 19 '13 at 17:59
    
Yes, IThing is the data context. I'm binding to the properties within it... MyText in this case. –  Buzz Mar 19 '13 at 18:06
    
Yeah Xaml doesn't work with interfaces since it needs a concrete implementation in order to bind. You should use a viewmodel in order to get the functionality. –  Romoku Mar 19 '13 at 18:21
    
In my much simplified example above, Thing was my viewmodel. I think what you're suggesting it to contain Thing is a new class, say MyViewModel, that only has the readonly properties I want, which then access Thing. This is workaround #2 in my post. I think it may turn out to be the only solution that is not a hack, but still seems like it shouldn't be necessary. I think XAML should still honor interfaces it binds to, even if it does use reflection. Thanks –  Buzz Mar 19 '13 at 18:32
show 1 more comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.