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Hi I am trying to convert the following recursive pseudocode definition into a functional programming construct in R :

a = [ random numbers between 0 and 10 ]
b = [ random numbers between -5 and 5 ]
c = [ random numbers between 0 and -10 ]

x0 = 200
index = 0

function f(x) {
    index = index + 1
    if( x is between 200 and 220 ) return f(x + a[index])
    else if(x is between 220 and 250) return f(x + b[index])
    else if(x is 250 and above) return f(x + c[index])
}

Executable R code is :

a <- sample(1:10,size=50, replace=TRUE)
b <- sample(-5:5,size=50, replace=TRUE)
c <- sample(-1:-10,size=50, replace=TRUE)

index <- 0;


myfunc <- function(x){
  index <<- index + 1;
  if(index == 50) return(x)
  if(x <= 220){ return(myfunc(x + a[index])) }
  else if(x > 220 & x < 250){ return(myfunc(x + b[index])) }
  else {return( myfunc(x + c[index]))}
}
print(myfunc(200));

Would like to discuss any approach including Map/Filter/Reduce or Vectorisation. Many thanks in advance.

Furthermore, how can I retain the entire path of 50 x elements (rather than looking at just the one answer of x).

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3  
iiuc, all these functions you mention are not useful here... –  Arun Mar 19 '13 at 17:51
2  
To be honest, your code seems a bit strange, it's not clear what you're trying to achieve. Can you explain in statiscal terms what random variable (or vector) you want to simulate? What do you mean by "the entire path of 50 x elements"? –  Ferdinand.kraft Mar 19 '13 at 18:06
    
Hi all thanks for looking. Its a path dependent value that starts with 200. Then it moves between 200 and 300 fifty times depending on the immediately prior value of x (hence the recursive definition). By the entire path of 50 x elements means that I want to know all the intermediate values of x via the function myfunc. For instance if I rewrote this using a for loop, I would declare a results vector of 50 and then iteratively fill it before I arrive to my final value of x. Would you like me to write a for - loop version ? –  user1480926 Mar 19 '13 at 18:10
    
How is your function recursive? And why don't you want to write a for loop? –  hadley Mar 19 '13 at 20:53
    
hi @hadley yes - most recursion can be expressed as for loops and I can easily create a for loop here. But I'm trying to express this in functional programming constructs. There is very little documentation / guidance on understanding the power of functional programming with R in applied scenarios. –  user1480926 Mar 19 '13 at 21:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the Reduce function with the accumulate option to save all the intermediate values.

To see how this works, try it out on the simple "sum" function

x = rep(200, 50)
Reduce(x=x, f=sum) 
Reduce(x=x, f=sum, accumulate=T)

The answer you're looking for requires you rewrite your special function so it can be passed to Reduce:

foo <- function(x, y = 0){
    if (200 <= x & x < 220){
        x + sample(1:10, 1)
    }
    else if(220 <= x & x < 250){
        x + sample(-5:5, 1)
    }
    else if (250 <= x){
        x + sample(-1:-10, 1)
    }
}

Reduce(x=rep(200, 50), f=foo, accumulate=T)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that's wonderful. Exactly the kind of insight I was looking for. What about the scenario where I couldn't use sample and had to actually look up from a list ? Also I couldn't understand why you initialised x to 200s ? –  user1480926 Mar 19 '13 at 19:39
    
It would work just as well if initialized with a vector of 200,0,0,0,... It's just the first element that's important. –  kith Mar 19 '13 at 19:46
    
Gotcha - and how would I do the lookup ? would declaring a global variable and keeping track of index work ? –  user1480926 Mar 19 '13 at 20:29
1  
yes, using a global variable works. You would just have to increment the global index from inside foo at each call, like you've written in your question. You'd also have to remember to reset index to 0 before calling Reduce. Personally, I think loops can be a lot easier to understand than the "functional" approach. –  kith Mar 19 '13 at 20:46
1  
Reduce applies a function to a vector two parts at a time, 1. the previously computed part, 2. the current element. A function f applied to a vector [a,b,c,d,e] returns f(f(f(f(a, initial),b),c),d),e). I made the function with a default argument so it knows what to do at the first element. –  kith Mar 19 '13 at 23:27

I haven't gotten it into a functional form, but I can do what I think you want in R:

 x=200; index=0; while (index < 50) {index <- index + 1;
    if(tail(x,1) <= 220){ x <-c(x,  tail(x,1)+a[index]) } else
     { if(tail(x,1)  & tail(x,1)  < 250) { x <-c(x , tail(x,1)+b[index]) }  else
        {x <-c( x , tail(x,1)+c[index])} }
  }
 x
 [1] 200 204 206 210 213 215 216 219 227 222 219 220 223 221 224 229 231 227 226 229 224 223 221 221
[25] 216 218 223 220 226 221 217 224 228 228 231 236 233 234 229 227 230 229 227 227 225 225 228 232
[49] 227 230 228

Maybe this will help seeing a way to "functionalize" it. I think Reduce or replicate or perhaps a Reference Class object would have a good chance of providing mechanisms. This just extends the x-vector by 1 element and then uses that element at the next iteration to choose which increment vector to work with. If you wanted to go beyond 50 length output you could use modulo-remainder math for the index.

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1  
Thank you @DWin I had a sneaky feeling you might be answering this one :). I suppose my question pervades to functional programming in general to tackle tougher real world problems - especially for someone who has done OO / procedural stuff all his life. –  user1480926 Mar 19 '13 at 18:48
1  
I admit to having difficulties with this sort of simulation as well. None of the "usual" indexing methods work very well. cumsum and cumprod ought to have recursive/incremental versions. If I were anything of a C++ programmer I would be doing it with the Rcpp package. –  BondedDust Mar 19 '13 at 20:53
    
Your code indenting is making my eyes bleed ;) –  hadley Mar 20 '13 at 13:14

First, I'm going to start by parameterising the functions to match your original description and make things easier to change if the simulation parameters change.

foo_cat <- function(x) {
  if (200 <= x & x < 220) return("a")
  if (220 <= x & x < 250) return("b")
  if (250 <= x) return("c")

  stop("x out of range")
}
ranges <- list(a = 1:10, b = -5:5, c = -(1:10))

foo_sample <- function(x, n = 1) {
  sample(ranges[[foo_cat(x)]], n, rep = TRUE)
}

To me, this is the most important part of functional programming: writing functions that encapsulate important components of your solution.

Next we'll use foo_sample to solve the problem with a for loop. This makes the relationship between the current and previous values explicit:

n <- 50
out <- c(200, rep(NA, n - 1))

for(i in seq(2, n)) {
  out[i] <- out[i - 1] + foo_sample(out[i - 1])
}

Next, you can think about removing the for loop and replacing it with a functional. Unfortunately, there are no built-in functions that encapsulate this pattern, so you can either write your own (a good idea if this is a very common pattern in your code), or stick with the for loop (a good idea if you want your code to be easy to read).

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this looks v. interesting. Let me test it out. Thank you !! –  user1480926 Mar 20 '13 at 13:49

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