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I have a dataframe containing rows of data with column name FirmID and DEF. The columns DEF contains only zeros. The FirmID column contains firm ID. I want to have last 2 observations for a given FirmID. The column of DEF is only zero.

FirmID LTQ DLCQ DEF
1004   0.45 0.21 0 
1004   0.32 0.43 0
1004   0.36 0.47 0
1004   0.25 0.67 0
1004   0.56 0.34 0
1021   0.12 0.39 0
1021   0.16 0.31 0
1021   0.24 0.76 0
1021   0.37 0.56 0
1035   0.89 0.78 0
...      .   .   .
...      .   .   .

So how to obtain only last 2 rows for a given FirmID

1004  .   .   0
1004  .   .   0
1021  .   .   0
1021  .   .   0
1035  .   .   0
1035  .   .   0
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1  
since the values are all identical, why does it matter if it's the top or bottom 2? You can just take unique of your data.frame and then rbind it with itself once... –  Arun Mar 19 '13 at 17:33
    
+1 @Arun. Supply a realistic example or you will get a solution that may not satisfy your actual need. Or if this example is realistic, then Arun has your solution. –  ndoogan Mar 19 '13 at 17:42
    
thanks Arun, good point. I have of course few rows there and actually this is the data I need for the last two rows in particular. –  Max Mar 19 '13 at 17:43
    
I just tried to simplify the case by providing simple data frame but Arun made the point. Also please note that in the column FirmID the ID numbers are random length. So the code 1004 could have 14 entries but the ID 1021 only 5 entries. –  Max Mar 19 '13 at 17:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Suposing you data is called DF:

lasttwo <- do.call(rbind,by(DF,DF$FirmID,tail,2))
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thank you for the speedy and correct answer! –  Max Mar 19 '13 at 18:12

You can use the "data.table" package as follows (assuming you're starting with a data.frame named "mydf"):

> library(data.table)
> DT <- data.table(mydf, key="FirmID")
> DT[, tail(.SD, 2), by = key(DT)]
   FirmID  LTQ DLCQ DEF
1:   1004 0.25 0.67   0
2:   1004 0.56 0.34   0
3:   1021 0.24 0.76   0
4:   1021 0.37 0.56   0
5:   1035 0.89 0.78   0

Obviously, change the "2" to the number of rows you actually want (there's a contradiction in your question's title and its text).


Another option is to use plyr in a similar manner:

> library(plyr)
> ddply(mydf, .(FirmID), tail, 2)
  FirmID  LTQ DLCQ DEF
1   1004 0.25 0.67   0
2   1004 0.56 0.34   0
3   1021 0.24 0.76   0
4   1021 0.37 0.56   0
5   1035 0.89 0.78   0

And, one unusual alternative using base R:

temp <- within(mydf, {
  ID <- ave(FirmID, FirmID, FUN = function(x) rev(seq_along(x)))
})

temp[temp$ID %in% c(1, 2), 1:4]
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A base-R way to do this is to manually do the split-apply-combine dance. Using your data:

dat <- read.table(text = "FirmID LTQ DLCQ DEF
1004   0.45 0.21 0 
1004   0.32 0.43 0
1004   0.36 0.47 0
1004   0.25 0.67 0
1004   0.56 0.34 0
1021   0.12 0.39 0
1021   0.16 0.31 0
1021   0.24 0.76 0
1021   0.37 0.56 0
1035   0.89 0.78 0", header = TRUE)

We

  1. split the data on FirmID: split(dat, dat$FirmID). This returns a list which we
  2. lapply over, applying the tail function to return at most the last 2 lines, the result of this is a list whose components are the results from tail, which we then
  3. combine back into a data frame using do.call and rbind.

The entire call can be strung together into a single line:

do.call("rbind", lapply(split(dat, dat$FirmID), tail, 2))

which gives:

> (out <- do.call("rbind", lapply(split(dat, dat$FirmID), tail, 2)))
       FirmID  LTQ DLCQ DEF
1004.4   1004 0.25 0.67   0
1004.5   1004 0.56 0.34   0
1021.8   1021 0.24 0.76   0
1021.9   1021 0.37 0.56   0
1035     1035 0.89 0.78   0

If you don't like those pesky row names, just remove them:

> rownames(out) <- NULL
> out
  FirmID  LTQ DLCQ DEF
1   1004 0.25 0.67   0
2   1004 0.56 0.34   0
3   1021 0.24 0.76   0
4   1021 0.37 0.56   0
5   1035 0.89 0.78   0
share|improve this answer
    
Updated to match the OP's new data example. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 19 '13 at 17:51
    
thank you Gavin. Certainly your answer is nicer and correct but I have given the acceptance to Rcoster since he answered correctly about 2min earlier. Thanks a lot! –  Max Mar 19 '13 at 18:14

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