Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I started off with SQL (access)

IIf(Len([CAT]) < 3, 
Left([CAT],1) & 0 & Right([CAT],1),
[CAT]) AS CAT1, 
[HD0] &

IIf([TABLE].[HD1]<>"00",
" / " & [HD1_ABR],
Null) & 
IIf([HD2]<>"00",
" / " & [HD2_NAME],
Null) & 
IIf([HD3]<>"000",
" / " & [HD3_NAME],
Null) & 
IIf([HD4]<>"00",
" / " & [HD4_NAME]) AS NAME,

and did Oracle (Sql Developer)

Case
When length(cat) < 3
Then SubStr(cat,1,1) || '0' || SubStr(cat,-1,1)
Else cat
End cat1,hd0
Case
When TABLE <>"00"
then " / "
else HD1_ABR,null

When I run query in SQLDev I get error Error at Command Line:9 Column:4 Error report: SQL Error: ORA-00923: FROM keyword not found where expected 00923. 00000 - "FROM keyword not found where expected"

share|improve this question
    
As a side note, there are no square brackets in Oracle. Those are used in MS Access and SQL Server. –  bluefeet Mar 19 '13 at 17:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

MS Access syntax is entirely different to Oracle syntax. No square brackets, and different names for the SQL functions. http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e17118/functions.htm#SQLRF006

 Case
   When length(cat) < 3
   Then SubStr(cat,1,1) || '0' || SubStr(cat,-1,1)
   Else cat
 End cat1
share|improve this answer
    
CASE when LENGTH(CAT) < 3 Then Left(CAT,1) || '0' || Right(CAT,1) Else CAT END AS CAT1, HD0 –  user2186876 Mar 19 '13 at 17:53
    
No such functions as Left() and Right() in Oracle. –  David Aldridge Mar 19 '13 at 17:55
    
@user2186876 You can use LPAD (LEFT) and RPAD (RIGHT) –  Lamak Mar 19 '13 at 17:55
    
what if i have something longer IIf(Len([CAT]) < 3, Left([CAT],1) & 0 & Right([CAT],1), [CAT]) AS CAT1, [HD0] & IIf([TABLE].[HD1]<>"00", " / " & [HD1_ABR], Null) & IIf([HD2]<>"00", " / " & [HD2_NAME], Null) & IIf([HD3]<>"000", " / " & [HD3_NAME], Null) & IIf([HD4]<>"00", " / " & [HD4_NAME]) AS NAME, –  user2186876 Mar 19 '13 at 18:00
1  
@user2186876 Whatever the length, it's just a matter of using the correct Oracle syntax instead of MAS Access -- the expanded example you give doesn't seem to have any additional elements of syntax, so the answer ought to give you everything you need, I think. –  David Aldridge Mar 19 '13 at 18:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.