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I have a component that submits requests to a web-based API, but these requests must be throttled so as not to contravene the API's data limits. This means that all requests must pass through a queue to control the rate at which they are submitted, but they can (and should) execute concurrently to achieve maximum throughput. Each request must return some data to the calling code at some point in the future when it completes.

I'm struggling to create a nice model to handle the return of data.

Using a BlockingCollection I can't just return a Task<TResult> from the Schedule method, because the enqueuing and dequeuing processes are at either ends of the buffer. So instead I create a RequestItem<TResult> type that contains a callback of the form Action<Task<TResult>>.

The idea is that once an item has been pulled from the queue the callback can be invoked with the started task, but I've lost the generic type parameters by that point and I'm left using reflection and all kinds of nastiness (if it's even possible).

For example:

public class RequestScheduler 
{
    private readonly BlockingCollection<IRequestItem> _queue = new BlockingCollection<IRequestItem>();

    public RequestScheduler()
    {
        this.Start();
    }

    // This can't return Task<TResult>, so returns void.
    // Instead RequestItem is generic but this poses problems when adding to the queue
    public void Schedule<TResult>(RequestItem<TResult> request)
    {
        _queue.Add(request);
    }

    private void Start()
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            foreach (var item in _queue.GetConsumingEnumerable())
            {
                // I want to be able to use the original type parameters here
                // is there a nice way without reflection?
                // ProcessItem submits an HttpWebRequest
                Task.Factory.StartNew(() => ProcessItem(item))
                   .ContinueWith(t => { item.Callback(t); });
            }
        });
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _queue.CompleteAdding();
    }
}

public class RequestItem<TResult> : IRequestItem
{
    public IOperation<TResult> Operation { get; set; }
    public Action<Task<TResult>> Callback { get; set; }
}

How can I continue to buffer my requests but return a Task<TResult> to the client when the request is pulled from the buffer and submitted to the API?

share|improve this question
    
Is there any way you could pass an Action for the callback, and use a lambda to create that action at the point where you have all the types available? –  Matthew Watson Mar 19 '13 at 17:52
    
How do you mean? An action delegate takes no params, how would I return the data? –  MalcomTucker Mar 19 '13 at 18:03
1  
Why is your scheduler calling the callback? Should the callback not be called within the definition of ProcessItem? That would make the whole thing much easier. –  Servy Mar 19 '13 at 18:22
    
Servy - yes I agree, the code above doesn't work and is a sketch, so it could of course be called in ProcessItem. How would that get me around the typing issue? –  MalcomTucker Mar 19 '13 at 18:49
1  
@MalcomTucker Because RequestScheduler doesn't need to know what the type of the result is, because it's not calling the callback. Within the definition of ProcessItem you of course know the type of the result (and actually have the result) to properly call the callback. –  Servy Mar 19 '13 at 19:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, you can return Task<TResult> from Schedule(), you just need to use TaskCompletionSource for that.

Second, to get around the genericity issue, you can hide all of it inside (non-generic) Actions. In Schedule(), create an action using a lambda that does exactly what you need. The consuming loop will then execute that action, it doesn't need to know what's inside.

Third, I don't understand why are you starting a new Task in each iteration of the loop. For one, it means you won't actually get any throttling.

With these modifications, the code could look like this:

public class RequestScheduler
{
    private readonly BlockingCollection<Action> m_queue = new BlockingCollection<Action>();

    public RequestScheduler()
    {
        this.Start();
    }

    private void Start()
    {
        Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            foreach (var action in m_queue.GetConsumingEnumerable())
            {
                action();
            }
        }, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
    }

    public Task<TResult> Schedule<TResult>(IOperation<TResult> operation)
    {
        var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<TResult>();

        Action action = () =>
        {
            try
            {
                tcs.SetResult(ProcessItem(operation));
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                tcs.SetException(e);
            }
        };

        m_queue.Add(action);

        return tcs.Task;
    }

    private T ProcessItem<T>(IOperation<T> operation)
    {
        // whatever
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant thanks, I had discovered TaskCompletionSource last night and was just knocking something up, so I'm pleased I was on the right lines. The throttling happens in the foreach over the BlockingCollection, I have left it out for clarity. –  MalcomTucker Mar 20 '13 at 9:59
    
One last question - why do you use the LongRunning option? My API calls are about 70ms - is that sufficiently long running to use this option? –  MalcomTucker Mar 20 '13 at 10:00
    
@MalcomTucker It doesn't matter how long each API call takes. What matters is how long the whole Task will take. And it seems to me that that can be a very long time here, most of which will be probably spent waiting for GetConsumingEnumerable() to return another item. –  svick Mar 20 '13 at 11:16
    
gotcha, ok, yes that particular task just runs indefinitely pumping messages to the API, only shutting down when the user disconnects.. thanks for your help, brilliant stuff (as usual!) –  MalcomTucker Mar 20 '13 at 12:12

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