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I'm trying to write a program that finds the prime factorization for n! . I've done this successfully before, but I can't find the code I've already written so I have to rewrite it! :p here is the code:

import math                                                                                                                                                 
import numpy as np
import itertools as it
import operator as op

def primes(n):
    """A simple sieve to find the primes less than n"""                                                                                                                                              
    nums = np.arange(3,n+1,2)                                                                                                                               
    sqrtn = int(n**0.5)/2                                                                                                                                   
    for step in nums[:sqrtn]:                                                                                                                               
        if step:
            nums[step*step/2-1::step]=0
    return [2] + map(int, filter(None, nums))

def factFactors(n):
    """Finds the prime factorization of n! using the property found
    here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factorial#Number_theory"""                                                                               
    ps = primes(n)                                                                                                                                        
    for p in ps:                                                                                                                             
        e = 0                                                                                                                                               
        for i in it.count(1):                                                                                                                                
            epeice = n/(p**i)                                                                                                                               
            if epeice == 0: break
            e += epeice                                                                                                                                     
        yield p, e                                                                                                                                               

if __name__=="__main__":
    x = list(factFactors(100))
    print x, reduce(op.mul, [p**e for p, e in x], 1)==math.factorial(100)

The output is this:

[(2, 97), (3, 48), (5, 24), (7, 16), (11, 9), (13, 7), (17, 5), (19, 5), (23, 4), (29, 3), (31, 3), (37, 2), (41, 2), (43, 2), (47, 2), (53, 1), (59, 1), (6
1, 1), (67, 1), (71, 1), (73, 1), (79, 1), (83, 1), (89, 1), (97, 1)] False 

I have been looking at this for hours, and I don't know what is wrong...

share|improve this question
    
What output were you expecting? Also, why are you looping by index in Python? Make a new list instead of modifying the old one. –  Lattyware Mar 19 '13 at 17:53
    
Well, I am printing out the list of primes with their exponents, because I was looking online to see if anyone else had made this list so I can double check the exponents. If it was correct then the reduce bit in the last line should be equal to math.factorial(100), which it isn't. Also, why not loop by index? Lol. Why Should I make a new list? –  Broseph Mar 19 '13 at 18:00
    
Looping by index is hard to read, slow and more error prone. It also means that the function only works with lists, not arbitrary iterables. Python is not designed for looping by index, and doing so causes all kinds of problems. Also, naturals() is directly equivalent to itertools.count(1). –  Lattyware Mar 19 '13 at 18:02
    
I don't need my function to work with arbitrary iterables! And how is this slower than making a new list? How is python not designed for looping by index? I'm sorry if I sound ungrateful, but I'm really trying to find out how to fix my error, not get stylistic advice. –  Broseph Mar 19 '13 at 18:11
    
Using iterables rather than lists can make your program more memory efficient, really, lists should be avoided as much as possible in favour of generators. It's slower because of Python's design - look at the for loop - it loops over values and not numbers for a reason. –  Lattyware Mar 19 '13 at 18:14
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code changed multiple times while I was experimenting with it, but one problem the current version is that since factFactors is a generator,

x = factFactors(100)                                       
print list(x), reduce(op.mul, [p**e for p, e in x], 1)==math.factorial(100)

calling list will exhaust the generator and so reduce has nothing to act on. Use x = list(factFactors(100)) instead.

-

After correcting the result/results typo (well, the one that existed when I started writing this!) I can't run the code:

~/coding$ python2.7 factbug4.py
factbug4.py:31: RuntimeWarning: overflow encountered in long_scalars
  print x, reduce(lambda a, b: a*b, [p**e for p, e in x], 1)==math.factorial(100)
[(2, 97), (3, 48), (5, 24), (7, 16), (11, 9), (13, 7), (17, 5), (19, 5), (23, 4), (29, 3), (31, 3), (37, 2), (41, 2), (43, 2), (47, 2), (53, 1), (59, 1), (61, 1), (67, 1), (71, 1), (73, 1), (79, 1), (83, 1), (89, 1), (97, 1)]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "factbug4.py", line 31, in <module>
    print x, reduce(lambda a, b: a*b, [p**e for p, e in x], 1)==math.factorial(100)
  File "factbug4.py", line 31, in <lambda>
    print x, reduce(lambda a, b: a*b, [p**e for p, e in x], 1)==math.factorial(100)
TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for *: 'long' and 'numpy.int32'

but it does hint at what the problem probably is. (Since the code won't run for me, I can't be certain, but I'm reasonably sure.) Most of the elements returned by primes aren't Python arbitrary-precision integers but limited-range numpy integers:

>>> primes(10)
[2, 3, 5, 7]
>>> map(type, primes(10))
[<type 'int'>, <type 'numpy.int32'>, <type 'numpy.int32'>, <type 'numpy.int32'>]

and operations on those can overflow. If I convert p and e to int:

print x, reduce(lambda a, b: a*b, [int(p)**int(e) for p, e in x], 1)==math.factorial(100)

I get

[(2, 97), (3, 48), (5, 24), (7, 16), (11, 9), (13, 7), 
(17, 5), (19, 5), (23, 4), (29, 3), (31, 3), (37, 2), 
(41, 2), (43, 2), (47, 2), (53, 1), (59, 1), (61, 1), 
(67, 1), (71, 1), (73, 1), (79, 1), (83, 1), (89, 1), (97, 1)] True

If you want the convenience of numpy array indexing with arbitrary precision, you can use a dtype of object, i.e.

>>> np.arange(10,dtype=object)
array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], dtype=object)

but honestly, I'd recommend not using numpy here at all.

share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting. I don't get any error messages running this on my PowerMac, or on pythonanywhere.com. I will replace the numpy stuff and see how it goes! I tried the dtype=object and I got the same result. –  Broseph Mar 19 '13 at 18:31
    
Yeah, The problem stills happens when I don't use numpy. –  Broseph Mar 19 '13 at 18:36
    
@Broseph: are you saying that if you take your code and use int(p)**int(e) instead of p**e you get False? (Let's see if we can narrow it down.) –  DSM Mar 19 '13 at 18:38
    
Yes. I even changed the last line of the primes functions to return [2] + map(int, filter(None, nums)). Maybe it is a problem with pythonanywhere? That's what I'm using right now. I tried it with the ipython console and got the same result. –  Broseph Mar 19 '13 at 18:40
    
Okay, now that's weird; your code works for me, as shown above, which dramatically reduces the number of possibilities. Could you check the whitespace in your code (python -tt yourprogramname)? –  DSM Mar 19 '13 at 18:41
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