Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two threads; TaskThread, BackgroundThread.

TaskThread blocks on a 'receive data' semaphore.

synchronized (receiveSemaphore) {
    while (!dataIsReady) {
        try {
            receiveSemaphore.wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        }
    }
    ...
}

BackgroundThread notifies all threads waiting on the 'receive data' semaphore

receiveSemaphore.notifyAll();

Unfortunately as in life, things can sometimes go wrong and BackgroundThread never executes the statement notifying the waiting threads. How is a user to cancel when he gets tired of waiting?

I have a Cancel button on my JavaFX2 UI - but then what? In JavaFX2, the only examples shown have a thread running in a loop and checking the isCancelled() flag.

http://docs.oracle.com/javafx/2/api/javafx/concurrent/Task.html

Again, if the task thread is itself blocked, then how can it cancel out of there?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When the cancel button is pressed, invoke cancel on the task. This will interrupt the task if it is waiting and execution will flow to the InterruptedException block, where you can check to see if the Interrupt cause was a cancel call and, if so, return from your Task's call method, effectively cancelling and ending the task.

Your sample is actually pretty similar to the sample titled "A Simple Loop With Progress Notification And Blocking Calls" in the Task documentation, but your sample is even simpler because there is no loop involved, so you only need to worry about the blocking call.

Behind the scenes, when you invoke cancel on the task, an interrupt is sent to the Task thread to generate the InterruptedException on the thread.

Here is some sample code.

// Task cancel button logic.
cancelButton.setOnAction(new EventHandler<ActionEvent>() {
    @Override public void handle(ActionEvent t) {
        task.cancel();
    }
})
....
// Task call method logic
synchronized (receiveSemaphore) {
    while (!dataIsReady) {
        try {
            receiveSemaphore.wait();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            if (isCancelled()) {
                return;
            }
        }
    }
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, as always. The semaphore is in a different class than Task, but is on the same thread - is invoked by call(). So apparently, this method I have in my class is unnecessary? ` void cancel() { synchronized (receiveSemaphore) { dataIsReady = false; receiveSemaphore.notifyAll(); } }` –  likejiujitsu Mar 20 '13 at 5:03
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.