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I know the union all questions gets asked a lot, but I have a slight variation. I will be doing a union all on three different queries/tablesets. The first 2, by definition of their queries, will never have duplicates, but the third will definitely have duplicates.

My question is, does the order I do my union/union alls matter. For instance, should I do a UNION ALL on my first 2 tables that won't have duplicates (and never ever will) and then do a UNION to the third table since it will have duplicates? Or is the order better if its reversed? Or does it not matter?

Not a real pressing matter, just wondering if there was a best practice in this type of scenario.

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What perspective are you coming from? Trying to improve performance? – mellamokb Mar 19 '13 at 18:30
    
Imporve performance, best practices, etc. The user will be using this interface a lot so performance is key, but I'd also like to do things "the right way" whenever possible. – Ryan Ward Mar 19 '13 at 18:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

UNION ALL returns all rows, with no additional processing. A simple UNION sorts the entire row set to eliminate duplicates. While the optimizer may be able to figure everything out by studying the indices and constraints, you can always give it a little hand like this:

  select * from table1
union all
  select * from table2
union all
  select *
  from (
    SELECT DISTINCT * from table3
  ) T

This ensures that the sort-and-eliminate-duplicates is only performed on table3.

Anytime intent can be simply and clearly communicated better to both human users and compilers, that is almost certainly the correct way to write the code. In this case performance may also be enhanced, and cannot be degraded.

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Intriguing. So this would perform better than say select * from table1 union all select * from table2 union select * from table3 – Ryan Ward Mar 19 '13 at 18:48
    
As I mentioned, the optimizer might figure everything out if appropriate indices and constraints exist. Also, you would want to check the associativity of the UNION operator to ensure that your usage has your desired effect (which might vary by vendor!). However, the code above ensures that intent is clear to both human and computer users of the code, so is probably the "correct" implementation (. – Pieter Geerkens Mar 19 '13 at 18:51
2  
Anytime intent can be simply and clearly communicated better to both human users and compilers, that is almost certainly the correct way to write the code. In this case performance may also be enhanced, and cannot be degraded. – Pieter Geerkens Mar 19 '13 at 18:53
    
This post implies that UNION's are processed in statement order sqlservercentral.com/Forums/Topic1263409-2820-1.aspx. This would mean that simply putting a UNION ALL at the end would have the same function - it would 'distinct' table1 and table2 and then 'non distinct table3 into the result. So the question is which format conveys intent the best? Possibly the distinct one as that is more obvious to me than arcane UNION associative rules. – Nick.McDermaid Mar 20 '13 at 2:20

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