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wondering whether this gonna work, and how:

class sample
{
 int i;
 int func1()
  {
   int i = 0;
   i++;
   return i;
  }
}

reason I ask is because I have many member functions and bad name conventions.

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scope matters. The variable i in the class scope is not the same as the one in the function scope. –  andre Mar 19 '13 at 18:39

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Things get weird with scopes:

int func1()
{
    int i = 0;
    i++;
    { //1
        int i = 41;
        i++;
    }
    { //2
        int j = i + 1;
        cout << j << endl // this prints 2
    }
    return i;
}

The rule when using variables in scope is, it always refers to the most local scope first and works it way up. So in your example the i inside your function will not refer to the i in the class.

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When you say int i = 0 you're creating a new variable called i that hides the class member. If you want to access the class's i, you can do this->i. But it's usually better not to cause that kind of confusion in the first place.

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Inside the body of func1, you will be referencing the locally declared int i. In order to reference the class member, you need to reference it explicitly by using the this pointer:

this->i

this is a const pointer passed in to all methods in a class to represent the current instance. It is not passed in when you have a static member function of course.

The reason the locally declared int i is being used first is because it is in the same scope as i++ and return i.

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Variables inside func1 refer to int i = 0; (nearest i).

In C++, identical name variables will be used from same/nearset scope first.

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It works fine. All uses of the name i inside the function refer to the i declared inside that function. That is, the function will return 1 every time.

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What is your intention of i inside the func1(). Do you want to increment the outside i or the i inside the function. If you want the outside i to increment then this won't work.

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The return will in fact refer to the i declared in func1(). It's all about scopes.

A scope starts with { and end with }. All variables declared inside a scope will only be defined as long you stay within the scope or if you go into another scope. Hence

{ int i = 0; { int i = 1; { int i = 2; }}}

is perfectly possible. If you use i in one of the scopes you will always refer to the i in the same scope. To refer to an i of a higher scope is more difficult.

In your example you can still refer to the top i by using this->i, where this is a pointer to the object you are working with. Here is some more info (scroll a bit down).

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