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I'm writing a Sudoku solver and I've got working solve function.

bool Sudoku::solve(int row, int col){
    while (board[row][col] != 0){
        col++;

        if (col > 8){
            col = 0;
            row ++;
        }

        if (row > 8){
            return true;
        }
    }

    for (int number = 1; number <= 9; number++){
        board[row][col] = number;

        if (check_row(row,number) && check_col(col,number) && check_box(row,col,number)){
            int next_row = row;
            int next_col = col;

            next_col++;

            if (next_col > 8){
                next_col = 0;
                next_row++;
            }

            if (next_row > 8)
                return true;


            // return solve(next_row, next_col);
            if (solve(next_row, next_col))
                return true;
        }
    }

    board[row][col] = 0;
    return false;
}

And I can't really understand what's the difference between

if (solve(next_row, next_col))
    return true;

and

return solve(next_row, next_col);

however with the second line my function doesn';t work

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4  
The second one always returns something. The first one continues on if the condition is false. –  chris Mar 19 '13 at 18:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If solve(next_row, next_col) is false first one will continue function execution. And the second will just return false.

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solve(next_row, next_col) returns a boolean, if(solve...) checks its return value and decide to return true if the problem is solved.

In recursions you need a condition to stop it:

        if (solve(next_row, next_col))
            return true;

Will stop solve after finding the solution.

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With if (solve(next_row, next_col)) return true; the execution continues to the next line if false. The return is only evaluated if true. This means that board[row][col] = 0; will be executed if the condition is false in the first one but not in the second.

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In the general case, there are two differences between

if (solve()) return true;

and

return solve();

The first difference is that the function will continue rather than exit if the return value from solve evaluates as true. The second difference is that in the second line solve() would not have to return true or false but could return a non-zero value rather than true (if the solve() function did not return a bool value).

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First case:

if (solve(next_row, next_col))
    return true;

In this case it returns true when the solve function returns true and never returns false.

Second Case:

return solve(next_row, next_col);

It returns true if solve returns true and returns false otherwise.

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