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I need to (quickly) rarefy a matrix.

Rarefaction - transform abundance matrices to even sampling depth.

In this example, each row is a sample and the sampling depth is the sum of the row. I want to randomly sample (with replacement) the matrix by min(rowsums(matrix)) samples.

Suppose I have a matrix:

>>> m = [ [0, 9, 0],
...       [0, 3, 3],
...       [0, 4, 4] ]

The rarefaction function goes row by row randomly sampling with replacement min(rowsums(matrix)) times (which is 6 in this case).

>>> rf = rarefaction(m)
>>> rf
    [ [0, 6, 0],  # sum = 6
      [0, 3, 3],  # sum = 6
      [0, 3, 3] ] # sum = 6

The results are random but the row sums are always the same.

>>> rf = rarefaction(m)
>>> rf
    [ [0, 6, 0],   # sum = 6
      [0, 2, 4],   # sum = 6
      [0, 4, 2], ] # sum = 6

PyCogent has a function that does this row by row however it is very slow on large matrices.

I have a feeling that there is a function in Numpy that can do this but I'm not sure what it would be called.

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I assume nowsums really means rowsums? –  Warren Weckesser Mar 19 '13 at 19:23
    
Yes, thank you. –  Austin Mar 19 '13 at 19:30

2 Answers 2

I think the question is not entirely clear. I suppose the rarefaction matrix gives you the number of samples you take from each coefficient of your original matrix?

Looking at the code in your link, there might be potential to speed it up. Operate on transposed matrices and rewrite the code of your link to operate on columns instead of rows. Because that would allow your processor to cache the values it samples better, i.e. there are less jumps in the memory.

The rest is as I would do it as well, using numpy (does not have to mean that that is the most efficient way).

If you need it faster, you can try to code the function in C++ and including it into your python with scipy.weave. In C++ I would go for every row and build a lookup table of positions that are >0, generate min(rowsums(matrix)) integers within the range equal to the number of items in the lookup table. I would accumulate how often each position in the lookup table was drawn and then put those numbers back into the right positions in the array. That code should literatlly be just a few lines.

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import numpy as np
from numpy.random import RandomState

def rarefaction(M, seed=0):
    prng = RandomState(seed) # reproducible results
    noccur = np.sum(M, axis=1) # number of occurrences for each sample
    nvar = M.shape[1] # number of variables
    depth = np.min(noccur) # sampling depth

    Mrarefied = np.empty_like(M)
    for i in range(M.shape[0]): # for each sample
        p = M[i] / float(noccur[i]) # relative frequency / probability
        choice = prng.choice(nvar, depth, p=p)
        Mrarefied[i] = np.bincount(choice, minlength=nvar)

    return Mrarefied

Example:

>>> M = np.array([[0, 9, 0], [0, 3, 3], [0, 4, 4]])
>>> M
array([[0, 9, 0],
       [0, 3, 3],
       [0, 4, 4]])
>>> rarefaction(M)
array([[0, 6, 0],
       [0, 2, 4],
       [0, 3, 3]])
>>> rarefaction(M, seed=1)
array([[0, 6, 0],
       [0, 4, 2],
       [0, 3, 3]])
>>> rarefaction(M, seed=2)
array([[0, 6, 0],
       [0, 3, 3],
       [0, 3, 3]])

Cheers, Davide

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