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I'm writing a unit test that verify if the xml is formatted correctly, but this is failing and I can't figure out why.

So I decided to test the code of this blog post and test in the Grails console, it also fails.

import groovy.xml.*

def prettyXml = '''\
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<languages>
  <language id="1">Groovy</language>
  <language id="2">Java</language>
  <language id="3">Scala</language>
</languages>
'''


// Pretty print a non-formatted XML String.
def xmlString = '<languages><language id="1">Groovy</language><language id="2">Java</language><language id="3">Scala</language></languages>'
assert XmlUtil.serialize(xmlString) == prettyXml

Assertion fails with:

Assertion failed: 

assert XmlUtil.serialize(xmlString) == prettyXml
               |         |          |  |
               |         |          |  <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
               |         |          |  <languages>
               |         |          |    <language id="1">Groovy</language>
               |         |          |    <language id="2">Java</language>
               |         |          |    <language id="3">Scala</language>
               |         |          |  </languages>
               |         |          false
               |         <languages><language id="1">Groovy</language><language id="2">Java</language><language id="3">Scala</language></languages>
               <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
               <languages>
                 <language id="1">Groovy</language>
                 <language id="2">Java</language>
                 <language id="3">Scala</language>
               </languages>

I'm using Grails 2.2.1, that uses Groovy 2.0.7, on Windows 7.

Maybe is something related with the OS line separator?

EDIT

I saved both strings to file, and checked with Notepad++

The parsed xml (XmlUtils) have CL+RF as line separator but the prettyXml have only LF. I also tested using \n instead of a multi line declaration, with same result!

Groovy shouldn't use CL+RF always, since this is the Windows line separator?

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What about opening both versions in a hex editor to check for weird EOL bytes and stuff? –  Will P Mar 19 '13 at 20:08
2  
Maybe try xmlunit? –  tim_yates Mar 19 '13 at 20:20
    
@WillP Good catch. Sometimes you spent a lot of time seeing something that your brain stop working hehe. Check my update –  Sérgio Michels Mar 19 '13 at 20:22
    
@tim_yates Thanks, XMLUnit returns them as equals. I'm just puzzled why the line separator is different. –  Sérgio Michels Mar 19 '13 at 20:30

1 Answer 1

In the Groovy String/GString docs, it says in relation to multi-line literals:

There[sic] are always represented by the character '\n', regardless of the line-termination conventions of the host system.

They don't really say why, unfortunately.

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