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I'm wondering if there is a way to sort an Arraylist of custom objects to fit the situation explained below? I'm assuming I'll have to write a custom comparator.

Let's say I have an object class that looks like this:

public class Person {
    private String status;    //options: Online, Away, Offline
    private String name;      //Person's name
    private Date date;        //Last signed on

    //basic constructor
    public Person() {
        //set default values
    }

    //constructor to set all variables
    public Person(String s, String n, Date d) {
        status = s;
        name = n;
        date = d;
    }

    //setters & getters for each of the fields
}

Sorting based on name and date should be fairly easy. However, I'm wondering how I would sort based on the status? I would like to be able to sort my array based on whether the person is currently online and also who is offline. I'm not too concerned with who is away.

The above class is just an example class. My actual class has a JLabel set an icon based on the status. The setText() remains unused. I thought of a possibility of setting the label to values of 0, 1, and 2 and just using a typical integer comparator but I wasn't sure if that was an advised way of doing it.

Surely I'm missing an obvious solution here, so perhaps a comment or link can provide the necessary information. I know there are tons of 'Sort Arraylist' threads here at SO and I've browsed a lot of them. Most of them are just sorting Strings alphabetically or Integers though.

share|improve this question
3  
Status should probably be an Enum. – Lodewijk Bogaards Mar 19 '13 at 19:41
    
See the javadoc for collections on how you sort after you have written your comparator: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/… – nattyddubbs Mar 19 '13 at 19:48
    
@mrhobo I'll read into Enum. With an Enum, I'm assuming I would give them values and sort based on the integer values? Nattyddubbs, I'm currently reading the link. – WilliamShatner Mar 19 '13 at 19:49
1  
What doesn't make sense with the question is that there is no "natural" ordering of status' unless you are using String ordering where Online > Offline > Away. With an Enum you can define their ordering within the object or just by putting them in the desired "order" in the enum declaration. – nattyddubbs Mar 19 '13 at 19:51
    
@nattyddubbs Wow, I wasn't aware that putting them in a desired order in the Enum automatically defined it like so. I obviously need to read up on Enums. Thank you. My apologies for my ignorance. – WilliamShatner Mar 19 '13 at 19:54
up vote 4 down vote accepted

if i understand correctly you basically want to sort on 2 fields - the major field is status (so people of the same status are bunched together) and then, whithin each gruop of people with the same status, by name.

a comparator that does this looks like this:

 public class CompositePersonComparator implements Comparator<Person> {    
    @Override
    public int compare(Person a, Person b) {
       //1st and foremost - see if they are not of the same status.
       int statusComparison = a.getStatus().compareTo(b.getStatus());
       if (statusComparison!=0) return statusComparison;
       //logical else - same status, sort by name
       return a.getName().compareTo(b.getName());
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
You did understand what I'm asking correctly. Thank you for the example, if you don't mind could you explain how that is sorting it? How do I know if it is sorting by Online, Offline, or Away? – WilliamShatner Mar 19 '13 at 19:47
    
@WilliamShatner - it relies on all properties involved being Comparable to themselves. Integers, Strings and most built-ins are. if you make status into an Enum as suggested above yuo could either make it implement Comparable<Status> on rely on built-in enum comparison (by the order they are written). Strings compare alphabetically. a return value of 0 from a compare() method indicates equality - think of a.compareTo(b) as being "like" a-b in math – radai Mar 19 '13 at 19:49
    
Thank you for the explanation. I believe the example above would just sort the strings alphabetically. So I do indeed need to use an Enum (like illustrated by Thorn). – WilliamShatner Mar 19 '13 at 20:05

Using enums can be useful here enum MyEnum { ONLINE, AWAY, OFFLINE;}

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1  
That could actually be a good answer to the question. However, you might want to expand a bit on how this would work. – Andrew Barber Mar 19 '13 at 19:52
1  
Indeed this was a good answer to the question. I agree with Andrew though, I didn't know much about Enums so it would have been great if you had expanded on it like Thorn did. +1 though as you are right. – WilliamShatner Mar 19 '13 at 20:07

I suggest we handle the status as an enumerated data type instead of a String where it can only be one of a few strings. This makes it easy to write a readable compareTo method:

public class Person implements Comparable<Person> {
  private Status currentStatus;   
  private String name;      //Person's name
  private Date date;        //Last signed on

  enum Status {ONLINE, AWAY, OFFLINE};

  //basic constructor
  public Person()  {
     //set default values
  }

  //constructor to set all variables
  public Person(Status s, String n, Date d) {
     currentStatus = s;
     name = n;
     date = d;
  }

 /**
  *   Order the Persons first by status where all ONLINE Persons are listed first.
  */
  @Override
  public int compareTo(Person other) {
     if(other.currentStatus == currentStatus)
        return name.compareTo(other.name);

     return currentStatus.ordinal() - other.currentStatus.ordinal();
  }
}   
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the elegant example. You are absolutely correct. I will need to change the structure of my class and classes that make use of this variable now. – WilliamShatner Mar 19 '13 at 20:07

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