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I want to write a shell script that will read a file from standard input, remove all string and empty line character, and write the output to the standard output. the file look like this:

#some lines that do not contain <html> in here
<html>a<html>
<tr><html>b</html></tr>
#some lines that do not contain <html> in here
<html>c</html>

So, the output file should contain:

#some lines that do not contain <html> in here
a
<tr>b</html></tr>
#some lines that do not contain <html> in here
c</html>

I try to write this shell script:

read INPUT #read file from std input
tr -d '[:blank:]'
grep "<html>" | sed -r 's/<html>//g'
echo $INPUT

however this script isn't working at all. any idea? thx

share|improve this question
    
You might want to try this in Perl (or something other than a certain shell,) if possible: check out the answer(s) on this other question –  summea Mar 19 '13 at 19:50
    
@summea I can't. I have to use #!/usr/bin/bash –  Hanna Gabby Mar 19 '13 at 19:52
    
should the comments be preserved? –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '13 at 19:52
    
@fredrikPihl yes –  Hanna Gabby Mar 19 '13 at 19:53
    
I guess I don't understand why you have multiple <html></html> pairs in one document, as well... –  summea Mar 19 '13 at 19:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Pure bash:

#!/bin/bash

while read line
do
    #ignore comments
    [[ "$line" = "\#" ]] && continue
    #ignore empty lines
    [[ $line =~ ^$ ]] && continue
    echo ${line//\<html\>/}
done < $1

Output:

$ ./replace.sh input
#some lines that do not contain in here
a
<tr>b</html></tr>
#some lines that do not contain in here
c</html>

Pure sed:

sed -e :a -e '/^[^#]/N; s/<html>//; ta' input | sed '/^$/d'
share|improve this answer
    
what [[ "$line" = "\#" ]] mean? and I can't only use grep and sed –  Hanna Gabby Mar 19 '13 at 20:07
    
see comments in source above –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '13 at 20:08
    
@HannaGabby - see update for a sed-only solution –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '13 at 20:18
    
so the first sed will remove <html>, but what the second sed do? –  Hanna Gabby Mar 19 '13 at 20:26
    
second one deletes empty lines –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '13 at 20:35

Awk can do it easily:

awk '/./ {gsub("<html>","");print}' INPUTFILE

First it operates on every line with at least one character (so empty lines are discarded), and it replaces "<html>" globally with an empty string on the line, then prints it.

share|improve this answer
1  
OP needs comments to be preserved –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '13 at 19:56
    
I can only use grep and sed. but what is /./ mean? is it mean the current directory? –  Hanna Gabby Mar 19 '13 at 20:00
    
@HannaGabby - /./ is a regular expression that means one character [any] –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '13 at 20:04

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