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this question is just speculative.

I have the following implementation in C++:

using namespace std;

void testvector(int x)
{
  vector<string> v;
  char aux[20];
  int a = x * 2000;
  int z = a + 2000;
  string s("X-");
  for (int i = a; i < z; i++)
  {
    sprintf(aux, "%d", i);
    v.push_back(s + aux);
  }
}

int main()
{
  for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
  {
    if (i % 1000 == 0) cout << i << endl;
    testvector(i);
  }
}

In my box, this program gets executed in approx. 12 seconds; amazingly, I have a similar implementation in Java [using String and ArrayList] and it runs lot faster than my C++ application (approx. 2 seconds).

I know the Java HotSpot performs a lot of optimizations when translating to native, but I think if such performance can be done in Java, it could be implemented in C++ too...

So, what do you think that should be modified in the program above or, I dunno, in the libraries used or in the memory allocator to reach similar performances in this stuff? (writing actual code of these things can be very long, so, discussing about it would be great)...

Thank you.

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4  
Your code doesn't seem to compile. What is this supposed to do? –  UncleBens Oct 11 '09 at 15:10
    
@UncleBens - try adding the necessary include directives. –  Daniel Earwicker Oct 11 '09 at 15:18
1  
Am not sure here, but the compilation you did is with Release flags or Debug? I've seen lot of asserts and checks in Debug mode code of libraries. If this is irrelevant here, please forgive the uninformed comment :) –  legends2k Oct 11 '09 at 17:10
1  
Can you post your real code? This is still wrong. You're not passing a parameter to testvector, for one. –  GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 17:12
2  
How did you manage to run this code if it didn't even compile for three versions? –  rpg Oct 12 '09 at 6:23

9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You have to be careful with performance tests because it's very easy to deceive yourself or not compare like with like.

However, I've seen similar results comparing C# with C++, and there are a number of well-known blog posts about the astonishment of native coders when confronted with this kind of evidence. Basically a good modern generational compacting GC is very much more optimised for lots of small allocations.

In C++'s default allocator, every block is treated the same, and so are averagely expensive to allocate and free. In a generational GC, all blocks are very, very cheap to allocate (nearly as cheap as stack allocation) and if they turn out to be short-lived then they are also very cheap to clean up.

This is why the "fast performance" of C++ compared with more modern languages is - for the most part - mythical. You have to hand tune your C++ program out of all recognition before it can compete with the performance of an equivalent naively written C# or Java program.

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5  
Like the ready to go boost pool allocator? It's almost a one line change to get the same performance. –  GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 17:10
3  
@gnud - try the comparison for yourself. Dropping in a custom pool allocator will make only a disappointing difference on most implementations, as they already implement malloc by sub-allocating from pools. Modern GCs and JIT languages can take advantage of information about the stack layout of function calls to identify unreachable objects, they can move objects to eradicate fragmentation, they can delay expensive work until after periods of heavy workload. By working at a higher level, they have more ways of optimising. Pointer-based memory manipulation is comparatively harder to optimise. –  Daniel Earwicker Oct 11 '09 at 17:15
2  
A, theoretical, smart enough compiler would realize that the vector is thrown away after it's filled, and optimize testvector() away completely. What I'm getting at, such contrived do-nothing test programs are, literally, meaningless. –  Pieter Oct 11 '09 at 17:24
6  
I can’t agree with your conclusion. There is nothing mythical about C++’s performance. Numerous performance tests demonstrate it time and again. There are a few notable niches where C++ has worse performance than other languages/engines. These are most notably strings processing and l12n / Unicode support. These have been well-publicized but they are extremely rare exceptions to an over-arching rule. And that rule still is: for most computation-intense algorithms, C++ is up to an order of magnitude faster than managed languages. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 11 '09 at 17:36
2  
@earwicker - i managed to cut the c++ version running time to 1/3 by using the boost allocator for the strings, and not re-allocating the vector between every call to testvector. See my answer below. Now, I don't claim that c++ is faster than jvm/cli at allocating a new object. But I claim that his way of going about allocating 2000 objects in c++, is pretty silly. –  gnud Oct 11 '09 at 17:57

All your program does is print the numbers 0..9000 in steps of 1000. The calls to testvector() do nothing and can be eliminated. I suspect that your JVM notices this, and is essentially optimising the whole function away.

You can achieve a similar effect in your C++ version by just commenting out the call to testvector()!

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1  
Like "benchmarks" that conclude that Java can complete infinity in zero seconds because the while(true) and its body get eliminated because they do nothing :P –  JulianR Oct 12 '09 at 7:59

Well, this is a pretty useless test that only measures allocation of small objects. That said, simple changes made me get the running time down from about 15 secs to about 4 secs. New version:

typedef vector<string, boost::pool_allocator<string> > str_vector;    

void testvector(int x, str_vector::iterator it, str_vector::iterator end)
{
    char aux[25] = "X-";
    int a = x * 2000;
    for (; it != end; ++a)
    {
    	sprintf(aux+2, "%d", a);
    	*it++ = aux;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    str_vector v(2000);
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    {
    	if (i % 1000 == 0) cout << i << endl;
    	testvector(i, v.begin(), v.begin()+2000);
    }
    return 0;
}

real    0m4.089s
user    0m3.686s
sys     0m0.000s

Java version has the times:

real    0m2.923s
user    0m2.490s
sys     0m0.063s

(This is my direct java port of your original program, except it passes the ArrayList as a parameter to cut down on useless allocations).

So, to sum up, small allocations are faster on java, and memory management is a bit more hassle in C++. But we knew that already :)

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You could also try to get rid of the sprintf, it was a massive time sink in my tests. –  rpg Oct 12 '09 at 9:03
    
I've removed the silly string object used in the original, and use one char buffer on the stack. I also only overwrite the number each time, not the prefix. I can't imagine sprintf is that much worse than a sstream, if at all. The problem was the original implementation of the string concatenation. –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 9:23
    
At one point, I entirely removed the vector and the std::string and I couldn't believe how slow sprintf was. Maybe this is specific to MSVC 9. –  rpg Oct 12 '09 at 14:28
    
Well, the moment I touch a stringstream, the time goes up by about a second... –  gnud Oct 12 '09 at 15:28

Hotspot optimises hot spots in code. Typically, anything that gets executed 10000 times it tries to optimise.

For this code, after 5 iterations it will try and optimise the inner loop adding the strings to the vector. The optimisation it will do more than likely will include escape analyi o the variables in the method. A the vector is a local variable and never escapes local context, it is very likely that it will remove all of the code in the method and turn it into a no op. To test this, try returning the results from the method. Even then, be careful to do something meaningful with the result - just getting it's length for example can be optimised as horpsot can see the result is alway the same a s the number of iterations in the loop.

All of this points to the key benefit of a dynamic compiler like hotspot - using runtime analysis you can optimise what is actually being done at runtime and get rid of redundant code. After all, it doesn't matter how efficient your custom C++ memory allocator is - not executing any code is always going to be faster.

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In my box, this program gets executed in approx. 12 seconds; amazingly, I have a similar implementation in Java [using String and ArrayList] and it runs lot faster than my C++ application (approx. 2 seconds).

I cannot reproduce that result.

To account for the optimization mentioned by Alex, I’ve modified the codes so that both the Java and the C++ code printed the last result of the v vector at the end of the testvector method.

Now, the C++ code (compiled with -O3) runs about as fast as yours (12 sec). The Java code (straightforward, uses ArrayList instead of Vector although I doubt that this would impact the performance, thanks to escape analysis) takes about twice that time.

I did not do a lot of testing so this result is by no means significant. It just shows how easy it is to get these tests completely wrong, and how little single tests can say about real performance.

Just for the record, the tests were run on the following configuration:

$ uname -ms
Darwin i386
$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_15"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_15-b03-226)
Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.1-b02-92, mixed mode)
$ g++ --version
i686-apple-darwin9-g++-4.0.1 (GCC) 4.0.1 (Apple Inc. build 5490)
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Which version of Java did you use on which operating system? –  Jesper Oct 11 '09 at 21:09
    
@Jesper: I used Sun JVM 6.0 on MacOSX in a MacBook and in Kubuntu 9.04 in an amd64 box. –  oopscene Oct 12 '09 at 0:38
    
@Jesper: Good comment, see update. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 12 '09 at 7:36

It should help if you use Vector::reserve to reserve space for z elements in v before the loop (however the same thing should also speed up the java equivalent of this code).

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To suggest why the performance both C++ and java differ it would essential to see source for both, I can see a number of performance issues in the C++, for some it would be useful to see if you were doing the same in the java (e.g. flushing the output stream via std::endl, do you call System.out.flush() or just append a '\n', if the later then you've just given the java a distinct advantage)?

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It would be interesting to see the Java code, but I doubt calling flush unnecessarily 10 times makes any difference to the performance. –  UncleBens Oct 11 '09 at 18:15
    
That was only one example, but flushing the output can have a huge impact, flushing forces data to be written which usually means blocking, just writing on a (buffered stream) would come straight back. –  vickirk Oct 11 '09 at 22:20

What are you actually trying to measure here? Putting ints into a vector?

You can start by pre-allocating space into the vector with the know size of the vector:

instead of:

void testvector(int x)
{
  vector<string> v;
  int a = x * 2000;
  int z = a + 2000;
  string s("X-");
  for (int i = a; i < z; i++)
    v.push_back(i);
}

try:

void testvector(int x)
{
  int a = x * 2000;
  int z = a + 2000;
  string s("X-");
  vector<string> v(z);
  for (int i = a; i < z; i++)
    v.push_back(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Preallocating the vector has got to be pretty insignificant compared to all the string allocations. –  dhardy Nov 1 '12 at 10:48

In your inner loop, you are pushing ints into a string vector. If you just single-step that at the machine-code level, I'll bet you find that a lot of that time goes into allocating and formatting the strings, and then some time goes into the pushback (not to mention deallocation when you release the vector).

This could easily vary between run-time-library implementations, based on the developer's sense of what people would reasonably want to do.

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Sorry, that was an error writing the program here. It is fixed right now. –  oopscene Oct 11 '09 at 15:46
1  
@ebascomp: Right, but now you have s+i in the inner loop. It looks innocent, but single-step through it at the disassembly level, and you'll see it's doing a lot. Another way to tell is to just pause it under the debugger. My guess is >90% of the time it is in the process of executing s+i. –  Mike Dunlavey Oct 11 '09 at 15:53
1  
One you've eliminated the unnecessary string addition, about half the time is spent in sprintf() and half constructing the std::string. Java may well be faster at the second, since std::string is not very efficient. I'm dubious that the cost of sprintf() can be reduced though. –  alex tingle Oct 11 '09 at 17:08
    
@alex: I agree. If you want to do a whole lot of sprintfs, of numbers, it's going to take time, plain and simple. And making a lot of small strings is not going to be cheap either. –  Mike Dunlavey Oct 12 '09 at 2:01

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