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I am going through previous exam questions and my question is what is the correct way or ways to determine a String length and return it.

If the String is less than 5 characters in length then I can return it the following way:

public static String first5(String s){
     if(s.length() < 5)
     return s;
}

If the String is greater than 5 characters though, it can be returned in the following way:

public static String first5(String s){

     return s.substring(0, 4);
}

What I must note is that when I answered this type of question before in an in class test, my lecturer stressed that I should not really use 'magic numbers'? I am not sure what he actually meant by that though.

Is there a better way to return this type of method at all?

I am still learning Java so please forgive any errors in my syntax.

Many thanks.

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1  
Combine and put this return s.length() < 5 ? s : s.substring(0, 4). There is no magic number involved because you want first 5 characters. –  User 104 Mar 19 '13 at 20:31
2  
Your second implementation will only return 4 characters, not 5... –  Jon Skeet Mar 19 '13 at 20:31
    
Ah, yes I see. It actually stops before the 4th character. –  PrimalScientist Mar 19 '13 at 20:32
1  
You don't return a substring, you return a String object which happens to be identical in value to a substring of the input object. –  Hot Licks Mar 19 '13 at 20:33
1  

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This should be your method first5:

public static String first5(String s){
  return s.length() < 5? s : s.substring(0, 5);
}

There are no magic numbers here, but maybe the teacher meant the number 5 was a magic number and wanted you to generalize the function:

public static String firstN(String s, int n){
  return s.length() < n? s : s.substring(0, n);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks Marko. Can I ask what the ? and s : s.substring is? Is it like a 'for each' loop so to speak? –  PrimalScientist Mar 19 '13 at 20:35
1  
It is the conditional operator: if the expression before ? is true, the result is the one after ?; otherwise the result is the one after :. It's like if, but an expression instead of a statement. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 19 '13 at 20:36
    
Nice one. Always learning =] –  PrimalScientist Mar 19 '13 at 20:37

Note that there's no great shame in using an if statement:

String r = null;
if (s.length() < 5) {
    r = s;
}
else {
    r = s.substring(0,5);
}
return r;

The logic is clearer than if you use ?:. The advantage of the latter is that it occupies less screen real-estate, so you can get more of a large function onto a screen -- valuable if you have a large function, but counter-productive if not.

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2  
Ufff, when I see this kind of code in a project, it sets my hair on fire. There are so many things that can go wrong here, there are so many minute details to check to make certain there are no bugs. Especially when you are looking around a 100KLOCS codebase searching for the root cause of a NullPointerException. You could have at least made r final and not initialized to null. That would have helped a lot. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 19 '13 at 20:43
    
So what are the other things that are wrong with it? –  Hot Licks Mar 19 '13 at 20:54
    
It uses a variable that it doesn't really need. Two return statements would have served better. We obviously disagree on the effectiveness of the conditional operator, so I'm not going there :) –  Marko Topolnik Mar 19 '13 at 20:55
    
Two return statements is an option, but can be dangerous in a larger routine. (I can recall a case where a return from the middle of a routine led to a "manhunt" involving about 20 programmers and several weeks of schedule.) –  Hot Licks Mar 19 '13 at 20:58
1  
Two return statements are no more dangerous than two assignment statements. It is exactly as difficult track them all down---and that's if the variable is final. If not, the problem explodes. Separately, each variable requires you to make another mental slot in your short-term memory that tracks that variable. Three more such in the code, and your STM is overloaded, so now you're scrolling up and down the method trying to juggle all the balls at once, constantly failing at some end. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 19 '13 at 21:16

Essentially if the requirements ever change, you can easily change the value in one location; thus, it will be changed everywhere it's referenced. You won't have to worry about any fragments of the old requirements floating around in the code. This is generally a good rule to follow with a large chunk of code.

public class solution {
    static final int VAR1 = 0;
    static final int VAR2 = 4;
    static final int VAR3 = 5;
    public static String first5(String s){
        if(s.length() < VAR3) { 
            return s;
        } else {
            return s.substring(VAR1, VAR2);
        }
    }
}

Of course the variable names will have to be named something meaningful to the class/application itself.

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2  
This is a joke, right? :) –  Marko Topolnik Mar 19 '13 at 20:34
2  
That's pointless -- using "FIVE" instead of "5" does not make it less of a "magic number". –  Hot Licks Mar 19 '13 at 20:35
    
FOUR is not needed - see comment above :) –  Trinimon Mar 19 '13 at 20:35
2  
So according to your edit, FIVE could be 4 in the future? –  Kenneth K. Mar 19 '13 at 20:38
1  
note edits. used different variable names to lessen confusion –  Franklin Mar 19 '13 at 20:43

Is the number 5 is in your question? If not get the number as input argument with the string input.

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