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I have a simple html form, with multiple inputs.

I'm using jQuery validation to change de background color of these inputs when the user hit the submit button withouth filling them correctly (I know this is not ideal, but the field names are self explanatory and a red background is enough for me).

However, some of the fields, are type=radio or type=checkbox and I can't change their background colors. I wanted to change the text color of this fields to red, or change the background color of the text to red. I don't how to have two different classes applied to different elements from the jQuery validation.

Here are the relevant pieces of my code:

JS:

<script>
    $(document).ready(function(){
        $("#registerForm").validate({
            rules: {
                firstname: {
                    required: true,
                    minlength: 2
                },
                lastname: {
                    required: true,
                    minlength: 2
                },
                gender: {
                    required: true  
                },
                policy: "required"
            },
            errorClass: 'invalidField'
    });
</script>

HTML:

<input id="firstname" name="firstname" />

<input id="lastname" name="lastname" />

<input type="radio" id="gender" name="gender" value="male" />Masculino
<input type="radio" id="gender" name="gender" value="female" />Feminino

<input type="checkbox" id="policy" name="policy" value="accept" />Eu li e aceito os termos acima

CSS:

.invalidField {
    background-color: #ffdddd;
}

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Please explain this again. The code as you've posted it is already giving an error message with a red background on radio and checkboxes. What exactly do you want to do differently than what you're already doing here? jsfiddle.net/ZU82g –  Sparky Mar 20 '13 at 4:37
    
Sorry, I didn't post the whole code. It's too big. I just put there the parts I thought were necessary. I removed the error messages in my complete code. I just want to highlight the missing fields. I managed to do that with Connor McArthur's answer. I just need a way now to remove the highlight when the user selects the checkbox or radio input. –  DanielFox Mar 20 '13 at 14:21

5 Answers 5

Try this:

HTML:

<input id="firstname" name="firstname" />

<input id="lastname" name="lastname" />

<div>
    <input type="radio" id="gender" name="gender" value="male" />
    <span class="highlightMe">Masculino</span>

    <br/>

    <input type="radio" id="gender" name="gender" value="female" />
    <span class="highlightMe">Feminino</span>
</div>

CSS:

.invalidField {
    background-color: #ffdddd;
}

.invalidField ~ .highlightMe {
    background-color: #ffdddd;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! That's exactly what I wanted. I don't know what that tilde does in css, but ir worked. However, the highlight won't go out once the user selects the checkbox or radio button. Any idea how to remove it? Thanks. –  DanielFox Mar 20 '13 at 14:04
    
The ~ in CSS indicates a sibling. You'll need to remove the invalidField class from the radio in order to get the highlight to go away. –  Connor McArthur Mar 20 '13 at 14:38
    
And how do I remove that? The jQuery validation seems to do it automatically when I fill a field. –  DanielFox Mar 20 '13 at 14:45
    
I'm not too familiar with the jQuery validation library, but you might be able to use the onclick option: docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Validation/validate –  Connor McArthur Mar 20 '13 at 14:49

you could try errorPlacement. put this after the open bracket in the validate function:

$("#registerForm").validate({ 
    errorPlacement: function (error, element) {
       if (element.attr("name") == "elementName") {
            $(element).css('background-color', '#ffdddd')
       }
    }, // continue your validation code (rules + errorclass)    
});   

change 'elementName' to the name of your input. You could change the element.attr() == '' to test if it was type=radio or type=checkbox.

share|improve this answer
    
This works to apply different stylings to different input types, but I can't target the radio input or the checkbox's input text with this. The text stays outside the <input> tag and it's not affected... –  DanielFox Mar 20 '13 at 14:15

Couldn't you use the same class on each element from jQuery validate but use a more specific CSS rule to get what you want for coloration, example:

.invalidField {
    background-color: #ffdddd;
}
input[type=checkbox].invalidField,
input[type=radio].invalidField {
    color: #ffdddd;
}
share|improve this answer

I managed to do what I wanted by adding some specif JS to the radio and checkbox inputs. Here's what I did:

JS:

$('#policy').change(function(){
    if (this.checked) {
        $('.policyError').css('background-color', '#ffffff')
    }
    else {
        $('.policyError').css('background-color', '#ffdddd')
    }
});
$('.gender').change(function() {
    $('.genderError').css('background-color', '#ffffff')
});

HTML:

<input type="radio" class="gender" name="gender" value="male" ><span class="genderError">Masculino</span>
<input type="radio" class="gender" name="gender" value="female" /><span class="genderError">Feminino</span>
<input type="checkbox" id="policy" name="policy" value="accept" /><span class="policyError">Eu li e aceito os termos acima</span>

CSS:

.invalidField {
    background-color: #ffdddd;
}
.invalidField ~ .genderError {
    background-color: #ffdddd;
}
.invalidField ~ .policyError {
    background-color: #ffdddd;
}
share|improve this answer
    
See my answer. You can put your code inside the highlight and unhighlight callback functions and make it a lot more efficient. –  Sparky Mar 20 '13 at 15:28

You would need to use the highlight and unhighlight callback function options. Start with the defaults and just edit them to do something different on radio and checkbox elements.

I've already modified the default by altering the conditional statement to look for radio or checkbox elements. These callbacks fire for each element as each element is validated.

  • hightlight fires whenever there is an error on a particular element.

  • unhighlight fires whenever a particular element passes validation.

You just need to tweak the one part of each of these two functions to do whatever styling you need to those elements.

    highlight: function (element, errorClass, validClass) {
        if (element.attr("type") === "radio" || element.attr("type") === "checkbox") {
            // change this line to add special 'error' styling to radio and checkbox elements
            this.findByName(element.attr("name")).addClass(errorClass).removeClass(validClass);
        } else {
            $(element).addClass(errorClass).removeClass(validClass);
        }
    },
    unhighlight: function (element, errorClass, validClass) {
        if (element.attr("type") === "radio" || element.attr("type") === "checkbox") {
            // change this line to remove the special 'error' styling to radio and checkbox elements
            this.findByName(element.attr("name")).removeClass(errorClass).addClass(validClass);
        } else {
            $(element).removeClass(errorClass).addClass(validClass);
        }
    },

In the demo I used your code from your answer.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/qwj5S/

   highlight: function (element, errorClass, validClass) {
        if ($(element).attr("name") === "gender") {
            $('.genderError').addClass('invalidField');
        } else if ($(element).attr("name") === "policy") {
            $('.policyError').addClass('invalidField');
        } else {
            $(element).addClass(errorClass).removeClass(validClass);
        }
    },
    unhighlight: function (element, errorClass, validClass) {
        if ($(element).attr("name") === "gender") {
            $('.genderError').removeClass('invalidField');
        } else if ($(element).attr("name") === "policy") {
            $('.policyError').removeClass('invalidField');
        } else {
            $(element).removeClass(errorClass).addClass(validClass);
        }
    },

CSS:

No special CSS. This uses the same invalidField class since it shares the same properties.

share|improve this answer

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