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I need some help with looping, or a better way to go about this. The answer may be obvious, but I'm new here and feel a mental block right now: I have a log file that looks like this and I am trying to match all lines with the same ID: so I can later compare the values of matched ID's. I am able to match the first lines, but then my loop seems to terminate. I am not sure what I'm doing wrong, or if there is a better approach altogether. Any help is much appreciated!

Some notes:

  • when I split the lines, the XYZ ID column is indexed at line[2], where len(line) == 11.
  • I am trying to loop through the file and for each line, create an inner loop which scans the remaining lines of the file to find a 'match'.
  • If a match is found, I want to return this so I can compare values
  • The trouble is my code seems to break after the first match is found, thus returning only the first match found

below is my code and a sample of the log file that I'm working with (includes some edited strings just to keep some business data private). The actual logfile includes commas, which were removed before I pasted into this forum:

f = open('t.log','r')
for line in f:
    aline = line.replace(',','').split()
    if len(aline)==11:
        for line in f:
            bline = line.replace(',','').split()
            if len(bline)==11 and aline[2]==bline[2]:
                print 'a: ', aline
                print 'b: ', bline

#t.log

[13:40:19.xxx009] status    -------             
[13:40:19.xxx013] status    XYZ -4  -5675.36     quote  449.70/- 449.78 avg 1418.84 -7474.48       0.134     -55.630    -395.148    
[13:40:19.xxx021] status    XYZ  ID:22P00935xxx -4  3.92     quote:    0.98/   1.02  avg:   -0.98   -0.16
[13:40:19.xxx024] status    XYZ  ID:22C0099xxx0 -2  26.4     quote:   11.60/  11.85  avg:  -13.20    2.70
[13:40:19.xxx027] status    XYZ  ID:22P0099xxx0 10  -17.18   quote:    1.86/   1.90  avg:   -1.72    1.42
[13:40:19.xxx029] status    XYZ  ID:22C00995xxx 4   -42.5    quote:    8.20/   8.30  avg:  -10.62   -9.70
[13:40:19.xxx031] status    XYZ  ID:22P00995xxx 2   9.66     quote:    3.30/   3.40  avg:    4.83   16.26
[13:40:19.xxx535] status    total xx5.52                

[13:41:20.xxx688] status    -------             
[13:41:20.xxx691] status    XYZ -4  -5675.36     quote  449.83/- 449.99 avg 1418.84 -7475.32      -0.374    -213.006     -39.391    
[13:41:20.xxx701] status    XYZ  ID:22P00935xxx -4  3.92     quote:    0.96/   1.00  avg:   -0.98   -0.08
[13:41:20.xxx704] status    XYZ  ID:22C0099xxx0 -2  26.4     quote:   11.65/  11.90  avg:  -13.20    2.60
[13:41:20.xxx708] status    XYZ  ID:22P0099xxx0 10  -17.18   quote:    1.83/   1.87  avg:   -1.72    1.12
[13:41:20.xxx712] status    XYZ  ID:22C00995xxx 4   -42.5    quote:    8.20/   8.30  avg:  -10.62   -9.70
[13:41:20.xxx716] status    XYZ  ID:22P00995xxx 2   9.66     quote:    3.30/   3.35  avg:    4.83   16.26
[13:41:20.xxx718] status    XYZ  ID:22C0095xxx0 -10 35.6     quote:    5.40/   5.50  avg:   -3.56  -19.40
[13:41:20.001362] status    total xx6.68    

Result:    
$ python pnlcomp.py
    a:  ['[13:40:19.000021]', 'statusAAPL', '130322P00435000', '-4', '3.92', 'quote:', '0.98/', '1.02', 'avg:', '-0.98', '-0.16']
    b:  ['[13:41:20.000701]', 'statusAAPL', '130322P00435000', '-4', '3.92', 'quote:', '0.96/', '1.00', 'avg:', '-0.98', '-0.08']
share|improve this question
2  
you can't use for line in f twice in the same loop –  Fredrik Pihl Mar 19 '13 at 21:06
    
ahh, thank you –  user2136314 Mar 19 '13 at 21:13
    
Either this isn't your actual code, or this isn't your actual sample data. The lines in t.log have 12 columns, not 11, and none of them have values anything close to your output… –  abarnert Mar 19 '13 at 21:46
    
yes, the log sample was edited for some business sensitive information, but the main lines are actually 11 columns because the XYZ and ID are really one column –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 1:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you should probably use regular expressions (also called regex) for that. Python has the re module which implements regex for python.

See this as an example for the direction to look at: stackoverflow question finding multiple matches in a string.

Excerpt from the above: Logfile looks like:

[1242248375] SERVICE ALERT: myhostname.com;DNS: Recursive;CRITICAL

regex looks like:

regexp = re.compile(r'\[(\d+)\] SERVICE NOTIFICATION: (.+)')

which goes like this:

  • r => raw string (alway recommended in regexes)
  • \[ => matches the square bracket (which would be a special character otherwise)
  • (\d+) => matches one ore more decimals \d = decimals and the + for 1 or more
  • \] => followed by a closing square bracket
  • SERVICE NOTIFICATION: => matches exactly these characters in sequence.
  • (.+) => the . (dot) matches any character. And again the + means 1 or more

Parantheses group the results.

I made a short regex to start with your logfile format. Assuming your log from above is saved as log.txt.

import re
regexp = re.compile(r'\[(\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}\.xxx\d{3})\][\s]+status[\s]+XYZ[\s]+ID:([0-9A-Zx]+)(.+)')

f = open("log.txt", "r")
for line in f.readlines():
    print line
    m = re.match(regexp, line)
    #print m
    if m:
        print m.groups()

Regexes are not that easy looking or straightforward at first glance but if you search for regex or re AND python you will find helpful examples.

Outpus this for me:

[13:40:19.xxx021] status    XYZ  ID:22P00935xxx -4  3.92     quote:    0.98/   1.02  avg:   -0.98   -0.16

('13:40:19.xxx021', '22P00935xxx', ' -4  3.92     quote:    0.98/   1.02  avg:   -0.98   -0.16')
[13:40:19.xxx024] status    XYZ  ID:22C0099xxx0 -2  26.4     quote:   11.60/  11.85  avg:  -13.20    2.70

('13:40:19.xxx024', '22C0099xxx0', ' -2  26.4     quote:   11.60/  11.85  avg:  -13.20    2.70')
[13:40:19.xxx027] status    XYZ  ID:22P0099xxx0 10  -17.18   quote:    1.86/   1.90  avg:   -1.72    1.42

('13:40:19.xxx027', '22P0099xxx0', ' 10  -17.18   quote:    1.86/   1.90  avg:   -1.72    1.42')
[13:40:19.xxx029] status    XYZ  ID:22C00995xxx 4   -42.5    quote:    8.20/   8.30  avg:  -10.62   -9.70

('13:40:19.xxx029', '22C00995xxx', ' 4   -42.5    quote:    8.20/   8.30  avg:  -10.62   -9.70')
[13:40:19.xxx031] status    XYZ  ID:22P00995xxx 2   9.66     quote:    3.30/   3.40  avg:    4.83   16.26
('13:40:19.xxx031', '22P00995xxx', ' 2   9.66     quote:    3.30/   3.40  avg:    4.83   16.26')

Every second line is the output which is a list containing the matched groups.

If you add this to the programm above:

print "ID is : ", m.groups()[1]

the output is:

[13:40:19.xxx021] status    XYZ  ID:22P00935xxx -4  3.92     quote:    0.98/   1.02  avg:   -0.98   -0.16

ID is :  22P00935xxx

[13:40:19.xxx024] status    XYZ  ID:22C0099xxx0 -2  26.4     quote:   11.60/  11.85  avg:  -13.20    2.70

ID is :  22C0099xxx0

Which matches your IDs you want to compare. Just play with it a little to get the result you really want.

Final example catches the ID, tests if its already there and adds the matched lines to a dictionary which has te IDs as its key:

import re regexp = re.compile(r'[(\d{2}:\d{2}:\d{2}.xxx\d{3})][\s]+status[\s]+XYZ[\s]+ID:([0-9A-Zx]+)(.+)')

res = {}

f = open("log.txt", "r")
for line in f.readlines():
    print line
    m = re.match(regexp, line)  
    if m:
        print m.groups()
        id = m.groups()[1]
        if id in res:
            #print "added to existing ID"
            res[id].append([m.groups()[0], m.groups()[2]])
        else:
            #print "new ID"
            res[id] = [m.groups()[0], m.groups()[2]]

for id in res:
    print "ID: ", id
    print res[id]

Now you can play around and fine tune it to adapt it to your needs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I tried this, however I got this error: –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 14:57
    
Traceback (most recent call last): File "pnlcompregex.py", line 9, in ? print m.groups() AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'groups' –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 15:00
    
could this be because I am using Python 2.4? –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 15:01
    
@user2136314 Hi, most probably not. Just add an if m: before the print. I will update the example accordingly. The error means that the pattern didnt match and the m object is None. This is because your log doesnt contain an ID: in its first line –  klaas Mar 20 '13 at 16:15
    
Never mind, I found out the problem was there were some lines that were blank; so I just use if len(line) >1 to filter out these lines causing the error –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 17:00

You could use the filter function to get any line with "ID" in it.

file = open('t.log', 'r')
result = filter(lambda s: "ID" in s, file)

You could also use a list comprehension:

file = open('t.log', 'r')
result = [s for s in file if 'ID' in s]
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think you can use with ... as in Python 2.4. –  squiguy Mar 19 '13 at 21:24
    
Yes, as The with Statement says, it's new in 2.5. (And requires a __future__ statement even there.) –  abarnert Mar 19 '13 at 21:27
    
Ah yes, my bad. Just updated it. –  aikbix Mar 19 '13 at 21:27
    
yes, unfortunately, I cannot use the with...as syntax –  user2136314 Mar 19 '13 at 21:27
    
Why are you saying "use the reduce function" when you're using filter rather than reduce? –  abarnert Mar 19 '13 at 21:27

This probably isn't the best way to solve your problem, but if you want to know how to make it work:

The problem here is that your inner for line in f: loop consumes the whole rest of the file—so when you get back to the outer loop, there's nothing left to read. (There's a second problem: When I run your code on your data, len(aline) is always 12, not 11. But that's a trivial fix.)

This isn't specific to files; it's how all iterators work in Python. There are two general ways to deal with this for any iterator, plus one file-specific solution.

First, there's itertools.tee. This takes an iterator, and returns two iterators, each of which can be advanced independently. Under the covers, it obviously has to use some storage to handle things if they get out of sync, which is why the documentation says this:

In general, if one iterator uses most or all of the data before another iterator starts, it is faster to use list() instead of tee().

And that's the other option: Read the whole iterator into a list, so you can loop over slices.

This is clearly one of those cases where one iterator uses most of the data while the other one's sitting around waiting. For example, the first time through the inner loop, you're reading lines 1-20000 before the outer loop reads line 1. So, a list is a better option here. So:

f = open('t.log','r')
contents = list(f)
f.close()
for idx, line in enumerate(contents):
    aline = line.replace(',','').split()
    if len(aline)==11:
        for line in contents[idx+1:]:
            bline = line.replace(',','').split()
            if len(bline)==11 and aline[2]==bline[2]:
                print 'a: ', aline
                print 'b: ', bline

Finally, if you have an fancy iterator that can be checkpointed and resumed in some way, you can checkpoint it right before the inner loop, then resume it right after. And fortunately, files happen to have such a thing: tell returns the current file position, and seek jumps to a specified position. (There's a big warning saying that "If the file is opened in text mode (without 'b'), only offsets returned by tell() are legal." But that's fine; you're only using offsets returned by tell here.)

So:

f = open('t.log','r')
for line in f:
    aline = line.replace(',','').split()
    if len(aline)==11:
        pos = f.tell()
        for line in f:
            bline = line.replace(',','').split()
            if len(bline)==11 and aline[2]==bline[2]:
                print 'a: ', aline
                print 'b: ', bline
        f.seek(pos)
share|improve this answer
    
abarnert, what does this do?: for line in contents[idx+1:]: –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 19:36
    
btw, your code seemed to get the job done for me, but I am still trying to understand why it works –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 19:39
    
so far I think I can tell that contents[idx+1:] returns a list starting at the next 'line'(item) in the list and ending at the end of the list. So, in the outer part of the loop, we look for alines with len==11. When we find one of these, we know the index of it because of the enumerate function. Then we proceed to inner loop through 'contents', where we use the index+1 as the starting point (this allows us to scan for new potential matches ("blines") without scanning over already-scanned items). Finally I see that we check if a line and b line are actually a match, then print if true –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 20:02
    
Yes. If you didn't already know about slices and enumerate, and just figured them out for yourself… wow, that's impressive. That's exactly how it works. (Slices can do even more than that—the Strings and Lists sections of the official tutorial covers them pretty well, except for bizarrely expecting that everyone learning Python is already familiar with the language Icon…) –  abarnert Mar 20 '13 at 20:13
    
haha, thanks for the encouragement. Admittedly I have looked over slices and enumerate before, but this is my first time actually concentrating on using the enumerate function. I had to look it up. As for slices, I have already begun to use them somewhat and am just getting more and more familiar –  user2136314 Mar 20 '13 at 20:21

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