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I have two vectors with binary values that represent information about some data vector. The first vector indentifies whether a certain element of the data vector is broken. The second vector identifies the extend to which other elements are affected and hence also broken. The vectors look like this.

itself_broken = c(FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE)
startpoint = c(TRUE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, TRUE, FALSE, FALSE)

I now want to find all elements that are broken in the following sense: If one element between two startpoints is broken, all others between these two startpoints (including the left startpoint) are too. So in the above example the resulting vector should be:

all_broken = c(FALSE, FALSE, FALSE, TRUE, TRUE, TRUE, TRUE, TRUE)

I could implement this by using a loop for every itself_broken element going upwards, marking elements as broken until hitting a startpoint. But this seems really inefficient to me.

What is the right way to solve this?

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Why is itself_broken shorter than startpoints? Please fix the syntax error in the first code snippet. –  krlmlr Mar 19 '13 at 21:48
    
Why is the last of all_broken TRUE when both itself and start are FALSE? Can you try to explain what you mean a little better? –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 19 '13 at 23:01
    
In the example startpoint defines three groups (since we have three values of TRUE). The sizes of each group are 3, 2 and 3. Whenever one element of the group is FALSE as indicated by itself_broken, the whole group should be FALSE. The last element of all_broken is also broken because its group contains one element that is broken (i.e. the second of the group, which is the second last of the whole vector). –  user2188457 Mar 19 '13 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Like this:

ave(itself_broken, cumsum(startpoint), FUN = any)
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Use aggregate and cumsum

> itself_broken <- c(F,F,F,F,T,F,T,F)
> startpoint <- c(T,F,F,T,F,T,F,F)
> cs <- cumsum(startpoint)
> cs
[1] 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3

cs identifies the groups

> agg <- aggregate(itself_broken, by=list(group=cs), FUN=any)
> agg
  group     x
1     1 FALSE
2     2  TRUE
3     3  TRUE

agg tells which groups are broken. Now merge this with your original data:

> merge(data.frame(group=cs, sp=startpoint, it=itself_broken), agg)
  group    sp    it     x
1     1  TRUE FALSE FALSE
2     1 FALSE FALSE FALSE
3     1 FALSE FALSE FALSE
4     2  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
5     2 FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
6     3  TRUE FALSE  TRUE
7     3 FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
8     3 FALSE FALSE  TRUE
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