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I was looking through someone else's old code and having some trouble understanding it.

He has:

explode(' ', strtolower(preg_replace('/[^a-z0-9-]+/i', ' ', preg_replace('/\&#?[a-z0-9]{2,4}\;/', ' ', preg_replace('/<[^>]+>/', ' ', $texts)))));

I think the first regex exclude the a-z and 0-9, I am not sure what the second regex does though. The third one matches anything inside the '< >' except '>'

The result will output an array with every word in the $texts variable, however, I just don't know how the codes produce this. I do understand what preg_replace and other functions do , just don't know how the process works

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1  
That many nested preg_replace calls is just going to lead to confusion –  Scuzzy Mar 19 '13 at 23:30
1  
Break it up into three separate statements, using temporary variables. Then it gets easier to follow. –  mario Mar 19 '13 at 23:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The expression /[^a-z0-9-]+/i will match (and subsequently replace with empty space) any character except a-z and 0-9. The ^ in [^...] means to negate the character set contained therein.

  • [^a-z0-9] matches any non alphanumeric character
  • + means one or more of the preceding
  • /i makes it match case-insensitively

The expression /\&#?[a-z0-9]{2,4}\;/ matches a & followed optionally by #, followed by two to four letters and numbers, ending with a ; This would match HTML entities like &nbsp; or &#39;

  • &#? matches either & or &# since ? makes the preceding # optional The & doesn't actually need escaping.
  • [a-z0-9]{2,4} matches between two and four alphanumeric characters
  • ; is the literal semicolon. It doesn't actually need escaping.

Partly as you suspected, the last one will replace any tags like <tagname> or <tagname attr='value'> or </tagname> with an empty space. Note that it matches the whole tag, not just the inner contents of <>.

  • < is the literal character
  • [^>]+ is every character up to but not including the next >
  • > is the literal character

I would really recommend rewriting this as three separate calls to preg_replace() rather than nesting them.

// Strips tags.  
// Would be better done with strip_tags()!!
$texts = preg_replace('/<[^>]+>/', ' ', $texts);
// Removes HTML entities
$texts = preg_replace('/&#?[a-z0-9]{2,4};/', ' ', $texts);
// Removes remainin non-alphanumerics
$texts = preg_replace('/[^a-z0-9-]+/i', ' ', $texts);
$array = explode(' ', $texts);
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...matches a & optionally followed by #? –  Jan Turoň Mar 19 '13 at 23:32
    
@JanTuroň Already claraified. –  Michael Berkowski Mar 19 '13 at 23:33

This code looks like it...

  1. strips HTML/XML tags (anything between < and >)
  2. then anything that starts with & or &# and is 2-4 characters long (alpha numeric)
  3. then strips anything that is not an alphanumeric or a dash

In processing order of nesting

/<[^>]+>/

Match the character “<” literally «<»
Match any character that is NOT a “>” «[^>]+»
   Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
Match the character “>” literally «>»


/\&#?[a-z0-9]{2,4}\;/

Match the character “&” literally «\&»
Match the character “#” literally «#?»
   Between zero and one times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «?»
Match a single character present in the list below «[a-z0-9]{2,4}»
   Between 2 and 4 times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «{2,4}»
   A character in the range between “a” and “z” «a-z»
   A character in the range between “0” and “9” «0-9»
Match the character “;” literally «\;»


/[^a-z0-9-]+/i

Options: case insensitive

Match a single character NOT present in the list below «[^a-z0-9-]+»
   Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy) «+»
   A character in the range between “a” and “z” «a-z»
   A character in the range between “0” and “9” «0-9»
   The character “-” «-»
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