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I have a source string that may contain any characters including spaces, carriage returns, and line feeds (control characters). The control characters may occur anywhere including the middle of a word.

I have a search string that may have the same selection of characters as the source string but will normally be a substring of the source. The order and number of control characters in this search string could be different from the source.

When the non control characters in the search string match, I need to remove that string including any control characters within the string from the source string. The control characters elsewhere in the source string should not be removed.

My plan was to add \s* after every character in my search string. This is fine, but then I need to escape any Regex special character in the search string, or they will be treated as Regex commands and not the plain text they really are.

I can add \s* after each character ('mytext.scan(/./).join("\\s*")') but how do I then escape the special characters but not my inserted Regex code? If I do it the other way around, then I can escape the Regex special characters, but I then can't simply just add \s* after each character; I need to avoid the escaped characters.

For clarity Control characters = space or \t or \r or \n or \f

edit: modified the 3rd paragraph to improve clarity of my requirements

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Make copies of the source string and the search string. Eliminate all the control characters from the two copies. Search with the copy of the search string in the copy of the source string. You can do case conversion as well if you need to (or accent removal, or ...). Using a lot of \s* will probably dramatically slow down your regex. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 20 '13 at 0:01
    
@Jonathan Leffler But then how do you redo the replacements on the original string? –  Patashu Mar 20 '13 at 0:02
    
The search string only needs to be copied and preprocessed only once. The source string will need to be copied and preprocessed each time. If the worst comes to the worst, when you know there's a match, you can go back to your original source string and make a new copy of the search string so that you do have something like the \s* between each regular character, and apply the regex from the second (mutilated) copy of the search string to the original source string. Because you know there's a match, the performance should be reasonable, even if the fail-to-match mode would be far too slow. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 20 '13 at 0:08
    
@Patashu yes that is problem with the way the solution is presented I need to maintain the original string after the search text has been removed –  user2188711 Mar 20 '13 at 0:11
    
@jonathan the regex speed is not an issue although I appreciate your observation. Taking both your comments I am still struggling to see how I can end up with my original string containing the control characters after finding a match. I do appreciate your help though. –  user2188711 Mar 20 '13 at 0:31

2 Answers 2

A naive approach is

1) split the search string up into a list of individual characters (each a string)

2) sanitize each individual character (still a list of strings)

3) Join the list by \s**

*Except \s* won't work, by the way - \s* will match 0 or more whitespace, which is not the same as 0 or more control characters. See http://www.regular-expressions.info/posixbrackets.html#class , and use the form of 'control characters' that works in your regex flavour :)

\W* might work too, since \W is any character not in a-zA-Z0-9_. But I've never tested to see if that matches control characters or only printable characters.

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That's a nice solution, missed the simple one, doh! The extra processing is not a big issue. I will have a read and validate the correct regex to use for matching. Thanks for the quick response –  user2188711 Mar 20 '13 at 0:13
    
\w is equivalent to [[:alnum:]_] not [a-zA-Z0-9] –  dbenhur Mar 20 '13 at 3:01
    
@dbenhur You're right, I forgot _ –  Patashu Mar 20 '13 at 3:09
    
I checked and the \s is the right one in this instance –  user2188711 Mar 20 '13 at 9:48

More or less as discussed in comments:

Make copies of the source string and the search string. Eliminate all the control characters from the two copies. Search with the copy of the search string in the copy of the source string. You can do case conversion as well if you need to (or accent removal, or ...). Using a lot of \s* will probably dramatically slow down your regex.

The search string only needs to be copied and preprocessed only once. Each source string will need to be copied and preprocessed once too. If the worst comes to the worst, when you know there's a match, you can go back to your original source string and make a new copy of the search string so that you do have something like the \s* between each regular character, and apply the regex from the second (mutilated) copy of the search string to the original source string. Because you know there's a match, the performance should be reasonable, even if the fail-to-match mode would be far too slow.

Here's a Perl implementation of the ideas discussed.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

$Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1;

my $source = "'Twas (Tweedle-Dee's)\fBirthday\n\n\f\f\nand\ta\tl\tl\this friends were happy\n";
my $search = "(\fTwee\ndle\t-\tDee\r'\rs)\nBi\frth\fday";

print Data::Dumper->Dump([$source], [qw($source)]);
print Data::Dumper->Dump([$search], [qw($search)]);

my $c_source = $source;
my $c_search = $search;

$c_source =~ s/ |[[:cntrl:]]//g;    # Or s/\s//g;
$c_search =~ s/ |[[:cntrl:]]//g;    # Or s/\s//g;

print Data::Dumper->Dump([$c_source], [qw($c_source)]);
print Data::Dumper->Dump([$c_search], [qw($c_search)]);

if ($c_source =~ m/\Q$c_search\E/)
{
    # Locating the search in the original source...hard work...
    my @a_search = split //, $c_search;
    printf "Lengths: c_search %d; a_search %d\n", length($c_search), scalar(@a_search);

    @a_search = map { s/[][\\.*?+(){}]/\\$&/g; $_ } @a_search;   # Escape regex metacharacters
    #print Data::Dumper->Dump([\@a_search], [qw(@a_search)]);
    my $r_search = join "\\s*", @a_search;
    print Data::Dumper->Dump([$r_search], [qw($r_search)]);

    my $t_source = $source;
    $t_source =~ s/$r_search//g;
    print Data::Dumper->Dump([$t_source], [qw($t_source)]);
}

Good clean hieroglyphic fun — clear as mud, no doubt. The first three lines check that there aren't any silly mistakes. The Data::Dumper module prints data unambiguously; it is there for debugging. The Useqq variable tweaks the way the data is printed unambiguously.

The variables $source and $search are the source string and the search string. There's a match, despite all the control characters in each of them. Note that there are some regex metacharacters in the mix — parentheses are regex metacharacters. These strings are dumped for reference.

The next two lines make copies of the search and source strings. The control characters and spaces are removed, using a POSIX-based regex class to specify all control characters. These converted strings are dumped for inspection.

The if statement compares the converted source with the converted search. The \Q...\E parts suppress the meaning of regex metacharacters in between. If there's a match, then we enter the block of code in braces.

The split operation creates an array of single characters from the converted search string. The printf checks sanity. The map operation replaces each regex metacharacter with backslash and the metacharacter, leaving other characters unchanged. The join collects each character or character pair in the array @a_search into a string $r_search with \s* separating the array entries.

The variable $t_source is another copy of the source. The regex in $r_search is applied to $t_search and any matches are replaced with nothing. The result is dumped. The output from this script is:

$source = "'Twas (Tweedle-Dee's)\fBirthday\n\n\f\f\nand\ta\tl\tl\this friends were happy\n";
$search = "(\fTwee\ndle\t-\tDee\r'\rs)\nBi\frth\fday";
$c_source = "'Twas(Tweedle-Dee's)Birthdayandallhisfriendswerehappy";
$c_search = "(Tweedle-Dee's)Birthday";
Lengths: c_search 23; a_search 23
$r_search = "\\(\\s*T\\s*w\\s*e\\s*e\\s*d\\s*l\\s*e\\s*-\\s*D\\s*e\\s*e\\s*'\\s*s\\s*\\)\\s*B\\s*i\\s*r\\s*t\\s*h\\s*d\\s*a\\s*y";
$t_source = "'Twas \n\n\f\f\nand\ta\tl\tl\this friends were happy\n";

The string $t_source does indeed correspond to $source with '(Tweedle-Dee's) Birthday' removed, which seems to meet the requirements.

Converting this into Ruby is left as an exercise for the masochistic^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H interested reader.

Clearly, you could simply create and use the $r_search string as a regex and apply it direct to (a copy of) $source; it would work. But I'm deeply suspicious that if you applied it to kilobyte length source strings, the code would run very slowly. I've not done the measurements to prove it though.

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Thanks Jonathan, following some sleep and your very complete response I now understand what you were saying in your original answer. I will run some timings to see the performance impact in ruby and post back here. –  user2188711 Mar 20 '13 at 9:59

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