Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have multiple arrays in ruby of variable length from 1 to 40 :

@items is a typical array which could be anywhere from 1 to 40 in length. eg

@items = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

I want to randomly split the array into smaller arrays of lengths either 1, 2 or 3 to give a result of (for example)

@items = [[1, 2],[3],[4,5,6]]

or

@items = [[1],[2, 3],[4],[5,6]]

etc

I know you can split the array using @items.each_slice(3)... where 3 is a fixed length. But i want to randomly split large arrays of variable length into array sizes of 1,2 or 3 randomly... Whats the best way to achieve this?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

items, @items = @items.dup, []
@items.push(items.shift(rand(1..3))) until items.empty?
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. If one's ruby is older than 1.9.3 Kernel#rand only takes an fixnum max, not a range. @items.push(items.shift(1+rand(3))) until items.empty? works for older rubies. –  dbenhur Mar 20 '13 at 0:53
a = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
b = []
until a.empty?
  b << a.shift((1..a.size).to_a.sample)
end
# b => [[1, 2], [3, 4, 5, 6, 7], [8, 9], [10]]
# change everytime though

You can limit the sub arrays size by replacing the a.size with 3 or anything you want.

share|improve this answer

This solution maybe uses too many local variables, but it is non-destructive to the input array and flexible on array window maximum.

def rotateAndTake inputArray, windowSize
  rotator, returnArray, breaker = 0, [], true
  while breaker do
    window = rand(windowSize)+1
    if(rotator + window > inputArray.length) then
      window = inputArray.length - rotator
      breaker = false
    end
    returnArray << inputArray.rotate(rotator).take(window) if window > 0
    rotator += window
  end
  returnArray
end

Also, I just wanted to write a solution that used the "rotate" method.

share|improve this answer

Just for yucks, I thought I'd try a pure functional form with no mutating methods for this problem:

( (0..@items.size)
    .inject([0]) { |m,_| m + [m.last + 1 + rand(3)] }
    .take_while  { |i| i < @items.size } + [@items.size] ).
  each_cons(2).
  map { |s,e| @items[s...e] }
share|improve this answer

Here's another functional solution:

( [0]+
  (1..a.length-1)
    .to_a
    .sample(rand(a.length))
    .sort+
  [a.length]
).each_cons(2).map{|i,j| a[i..j-1]}
share|improve this answer
1  
this can produce subarrays of length > 3. a[i...j] is a nicer way to say a[i..j-1]. I believe it may be biased to shorter subarrays. –  dbenhur Mar 21 '13 at 20:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.