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If I have a variable from a dataset that evaluates as true most of the time should I put it in the "if" clause or the "else" clause. Is one faster that the other? I am sure it depends on things like the JavaScript engine and/or the operating system as it is coverted to Machine language.

Like this:

var usualyTrue;
// some more code here...
if(usualTrue)
    //do something
else
    //do something else

or like this:

var usualyTrue;
// some more code here...
if(!usualTrue)
    //do something
else
    //do something else
share|improve this question
5  
You should do whichever makes the code more readable. – zwol Mar 20 '13 at 0:41
    
I have heard that JVM is pretty smart and it can do code lookaheads, if the if is usually true the JVM should optimize this regardless of where the conditional occurs. – Kevin Bowersox Mar 20 '13 at 0:43
    
the JSVM (and most compilers/VMs) separate code blocks into lexical trees to optimize code like this, generally. – Codeman Mar 20 '13 at 0:48
    
Thanks everyone for reminding not to even waste time thinking about optimization at such a low level. It was just a curiosity taking me back in time to my Processor logic classes, where I remember learning a little about how processors can optimized things like this. Anyway too much time wasted already... – james Mar 20 '13 at 17:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It generally doesn't matter, so you should do whatever makes it the most readable.

Three reasons.

  1. The compiler is smart enough that it won't care much which of these conditions is the case, in most cases (unless you're doing millions/billions of comparisons, booleans are the cheapest evaluations there are)
  2. Branching (at the ISA level) really does mean this doesn't matter. Simple comparisons like this are essentially evaluated simultaneously through pipelining.
  3. The amount of time you would spend optimizing something like this would be far better spent thinking "how can I reduce the number of AJAX calls I make?" or "am I looping through the DOM unnecessarily at some point?"

If you're just curious about what is produced, you could compile the JS yourself using something like Rhino.

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You shouldn't worry about which is faster, since it will be marginally faster if there is any difference at all, you're just falling into the trap of premature optimization.

Current browsers (and compilers/interpreters for other languages besides JavaScript) have all sorts of optimizations for boolean logic so you don't have to worry about that.

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There's really no serious performance difference, but checking if(usualTrue) seems to make more sense. If you know what is usually true, you can avoid unnecessarily evaluating the frequently false expression.

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Write for readability

There is no performance difference either way, what should matter to you is writing for readability i.e. using meaningful variable names and appropriate logic.

e.g.

var errorFound;
// some more code here...
if(errorFound) {
    //do something
} else {
    //do something else
}

Avoid double-negatives though:

var noErrorFound;
// some more code here...
if(!noErrorFound) {
    //do something
} else {
    //do something else
}

As that makes it hard to read - to enter the else you're looking for !!noErrorFound - that just makes debugging harder :).

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