Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have the following code, so far, I want to check if a file name is already in the linked list fileList (or flist). according to the output, the string saved in the first Node was changed somewhere in Node* getFileName(Node *&flist) How did this happen? Also, is there anything else that I'm doing is wrong or not safe regarding pointers of Node and strings?

output:

in main: file4.txt
start of process: file4.txt
file4.txt
mid of process: file4.txt"
in contains, fileName in node: file4.txt"
in contains, target file name: file4.txt
end of process: file4.txt"
0
no recursive call

code:

struct Node {
    string fileName;
    Node *link;
};


/*
 *
 */
bool contains (Node *&flist, string &name) {
    Node *tempNode = *&flist;
    while (tempNode != 0) {
    	cout << "in contains, fileName in node: " << flist->fileName << endl;
    	cout << "in contains, target file name: " << name << endl;
    	if ((tempNode->fileName) == name) {
    		return true;
    	}
    	else {
    		tempNode = tempNode->link;
    	}
    }
    return false;
}


/*
 *
 */
Node* getLastNode (Node *&flist) {
    Node *tempNode = *&flist;
    while (tempNode != 0) {
    	tempNode = tempNode->link;
    }
    return tempNode;
}


/*
 *
 */
string getFileName(string oneLine) {
    char doubleQuote;
    doubleQuote = oneLine[9];
    if (doubleQuote == '\"') {
    	string sub = oneLine.substr(10);					//getting the file name
    	string::size_type n = sub.size();
    	sub = sub.substr(0,n-1);
    	cout <<  sub << endl;
    	return sub;
    }
    return NULL;
}

/*
 *
 */
void process( istream &in, ostream &out, Node *&flist ) {
    cout << "start of process: " << flist->fileName << endl;
    string oneLine;			//temp line holder
    while (getline(in, oneLine)) {
    	//		cout << oneLine << endl;
    	string::size_type loc = oneLine.find("#include",0);
    	if (loc != string::npos) {
    		//found one line starting with "#include"
    		string name;
    		name = getFileName(oneLine);
    		cout << "mid of process: " << flist->fileName << endl;
    		bool recursive;
    		recursive = contains(flist, name);
    		cout << "end of process: " << flist->fileName << endl;
    		cout << recursive << endl;
    		if (recursive) {
    			//contains recursive include
    			cerr << "recursive include of file " << name << endl;
    			exit(-1);
    		}
    		else {
    			//valid include
    			cout << "no recursive call" << endl;

    		}//else
    	}//if
    }//while

}//process
/*
 *
 */
int main( int argc, char *argv[] ) {
    istream *infile  = &cin;                          	// default value
    ostream *outfile = &cout;                         	// default value
    Node* fileList;

    switch ( argc ) {
    case 3:
    	outfile = new ofstream( argv[2] );          // open the outfile file
    	if ( outfile->fail() ) {
    		cerr << "Can't open output file " << argv[2] << endl;
    		exit( -1 );
    	}
    	// FALL THROUGH to handle input file
    case 2:
    	infile = new ifstream( argv[1] );           // open the input file
    	if ( infile->fail() ) {
    		cerr << "Can't open input file " << argv[1] << endl;
    		exit( -1 );
    	}
    	else {
    		Node aFile = {argv[1], 0};
    		fileList = &aFile;
    		cout << "in main: " << fileList->fileName << endl;
    	}
    	// FALL THROUGH
    case 1:                                       // use cin and cout
    	break;
    default:                                      // too many arguments
    	cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " [ input-file [ output-file ] ]" << endl;
    	exit( -1 );                                 // TERMINATE!
    }

    processOneFile (*infile, *outfile, fileList);

    // do something
    if ( infile != &cin ) delete infile;              // close file, do not delete cin!
    if ( outfile != &cout ) delete outfile;           // close file, do not delete cout!
}
share|improve this question
    
Have you tried stepping through your code with a debugger? It should prove more successful than using print statements to show which statement changes your data. –  Steve Guidi Oct 11 '09 at 18:28
    
Could you please provide us with the files needed to compile this? –  Håkon Oct 11 '09 at 18:39
    
I'd recommend also to use std::set to maintain file names instead of self-crafted list. –  dimba Oct 11 '09 at 19:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Could you post the original code? The code you posted doesn't even compile.

Errors I've noticed, in order:

processOneFile (*infile, *outfile, fileList);

There is no processOneFile() procedure.

istream *infile  = &cin;                            // default value
ostream *outfile = &cout;                           // default value
Node* fileList;
case 1:                                       // use cin and cout
    break;
processOneFile (*infile, *outfile, fileList);

This will call processOneFile() with an uninitialized file list, which will crash when you try to print the file name.

    else {
            Node aFile = {argv[1], 0};
            fileList = &aFile;
            cout << "in main: " << fileList->fileName << endl;
    }

aFile is only in scope within that else, so trying to use a pointer to it later will fail.

string getFileName(string oneLine) {
    ///
    return NULL;
}

You can't construct a std::string from NULL -- this will crash the program.

After fixing these errors so your code wouldn't crash, I couldn't reproduce the error.

If you're building in Linux, try increasing the warning level (with g++ -Wall -Wextra -ansi -pedantic) and running your code through valgrind, to check for memory errors.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, there is no such function as "getFileName(Node *&flist)" which is suposedly is causing the problem. There is only a "getFileName(string oneLine)", but there is no way this could change a string in one of the nodes. –  Håkon Oct 11 '09 at 18:43
    
You can initialize a string from NULL. The string will be empty. –  GManNickG Oct 11 '09 at 18:44
    
@GMan: No, initializing a std::string from NULL is undefined. On my system (and codepad, codepad.org/ZldIZHwo), it raises an exception. –  John Millikin Oct 11 '09 at 19:09

Ok, the code does now seem like it works as expected:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace::std;

struct Node
{
    string fileName;
    Node *link;
};

bool contains (Node *&flist, string &name)
{
    Node *tempNode = *&flist;
    while (tempNode != 0)
    {
        cout << "Searching in \"" << flist->fileName;
        cout << "\" for \"" << name << "\"" << endl;
        if ( tempNode->fileName == name)
    	{
    		return true;
        }
        else
    	{
    		tempNode = tempNode->link;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

Node* getLastNode (Node *&flist)
{
    Node *tempNode = *&flist;
    while (tempNode != 0)
    {
        tempNode = tempNode->link;
    }
    return tempNode;
}

string getFileName(string oneLine)
{
    char doubleQuote;
    doubleQuote = oneLine[9];
    if (doubleQuote == '\"') {
        string sub = oneLine.substr(10);                                        //getting the file name
        string::size_type n = sub.size();
        sub = sub.substr(0,n-1);
        return sub;
    }
    return "";
}

void process( istream &in, ostream &out, Node *&flist )
{
    cout << "Start of process: " << flist->fileName << endl << endl;
    string oneLine;                 
    while (1)
    {
    	cout << "Input include statement: ";
    	getline(in, oneLine);

    	if (oneLine == "STOP")
    		return;

        string::size_type loc = oneLine.find("#include",0);
        if (loc != string::npos)
    	{
    		//found one line starting with "#include"
    		string name;
    		name = getFileName(oneLine);
    		if (name == "")
    		{
    			cout << "Couldn't find filename, skipping line..." << endl;
    			continue;
    		}

    		if (contains(flist, name))
    		{
    			//contains recursive include
    			cerr << "Uh, oh! Recursive include of file " << name << endl;
    			exit(-1);
    		}
    		else
    		{
    			cerr << "No recursive include" << endl;
    		}

        }//if

    	cout << endl;
    }//while
}

int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    Node* fileList = new Node;
    istream *infile  = &cin;                            // default value
    ostream *outfile = &cout;                           // default value
    fileList->fileName = "Input";						// default value

    switch ( argc )
    {
    	case 3:
    		outfile = new ofstream( argv[2] );          // open the outfile file
    		if ( outfile->fail() ) {
                cerr << "Can't open output file " << argv[2] << endl;
                exit( -1 );
    		}
    		// FALL THROUGH to handle input file
    	case 2:
    		infile = new ifstream( argv[1] );           // open the input file
    		if ( infile->fail() ) {
                cerr << "Can't open input file " << argv[1] << endl;
                exit( -1 );
    		}
    		else {
                fileList->fileName = argv[1];
                cout << "in main: " << fileList->fileName << endl;
    		}
    		// FALL THROUGH
    	case 1:                                       // use cin and cout
    		break;
    	default:                                      // too many arguments
    		cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " [ input-file [ output-file ] ]" << endl;
    		exit( -1 );                                 // TERMINATE!
    }

    process(*infile, *outfile, fileList);

    // do something
    if ( infile != &cin ) delete infile;              // close file, do not delete cin!
    if ( outfile != &cout ) delete outfile;           // close file, do not delete cout!
}
share|improve this answer

Also, why are you wasting time writing your own linked list when the standard library already has a perfectly good one?

share|improve this answer
    
It's a homework assignment, of course. –  John Millikin Oct 11 '09 at 19:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.