Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two tab delimited files

file1.txt

field1
field2
field3

file2.txt

field1   value f11
field1   value f12
field1   value f13
field2   value f21
field2   value f22
field2   value f23
field3   value f31

I want the output

field1   value f11, value f12 , valuef13
field2   value f21, value f22 , valuef23
field3   value f31

I am trying this

awk -F"\t" 'NR==FNR{a[$1] = $1;next} { print a[$1]  }' file1.txt file2.txt

and it is coming as empty

If filds are in file1 and not in file2 then that should comas blank

UPDATE:

This is my output from my terminal

    ubuntu@ubuntu:/mnt/coding/awk$ cat f1.txt 
    field1
    field2
    field3
    field9

    ubuntu@ubuntu:/mnt/coding/awk$ cat f2.txt 
    field1  value f11
    field1  value f12
    field1  value f13
    field2  value f21
    field2  value f22
    field2  value f23
    field3  value f31

    ubuntu@ubuntu:/mnt/coding/awk$ awk -F"\t" 'NR==FNR{a[$1] = a[$1]", "$2;next}{gsub("^,","",a[$1]);print $1"\t"a[$1]}' f2.txt f1.txt
    field1  
    field2  
    field3  
    field9  

    ubuntu@ubuntu:/mnt/coding/awk$ awk --version
GNU Awk 3.1.8
Copyright (C) 1989, 1991-2010 Free Software Foundation.

UPDATE 2:

ubuntu@ubuntu:/mnt/coding/awk$ od -xcb f1.txt
0000000    6966    6c65    3164    660a    6569    646c    0a32    6966
          f   i   e   l   d   1  \n   f   i   e   l   d   2  \n   f   i
        146 151 145 154 144 061 012 146 151 145 154 144 062 012 146 151
0000020    6c65    3364    660a    6569    646c    0a39    000a
          e   l   d   3  \n   f   i   e   l   d   9  \n  \n
        145 154 144 063 012 146 151 145 154 144 071 012 012
0000035
ubuntu@ubuntu:/mnt/coding/awk$ od -xcb f2.txt
0000000    6966    6c65    3164    2020    6176    756c    2065    3166
          f   i   e   l   d   1           v   a   l   u   e       f   1
        146 151 145 154 144 061 040 040 166 141 154 165 145 040 146 061
0000020    0a31    6966    6c65    3164    2020    6176    756c    2065
          1  \n   f   i   e   l   d   1           v   a   l   u   e    
        061 012 146 151 145 154 144 061 040 040 166 141 154 165 145 040
0000040    3166    0a32    6966    6c65    3164    2020    6176    756c
          f   1   2  \n   f   i   e   l   d   1           v   a   l   u
        146 061 062 012 146 151 145 154 144 061 040 040 166 141 154 165
0000060    2065    3166    0a33    6966    6c65    3264    2020    6176
          e       f   1   3  \n   f   i   e   l   d   2           v   a
        145 040 146 061 063 012 146 151 145 154 144 062 040 040 166 141
0000100    756c    2065    3266    0a31    6966    6c65    3264    2020
          l   u   e       f   2   1  \n   f   i   e   l   d   2        
        154 165 145 040 146 062 061 012 146 151 145 154 144 062 040 040
0000120    6176    756c    2065    3266    0a32    6966    6c65    3264
          v   a   l   u   e       f   2   2  \n   f   i   e   l   d   2
        166 141 154 165 145 040 146 062 062 012 146 151 145 154 144 062
0000140    2020    6176    756c    2065    3266    0a33    6966    6c65
                  v   a   l   u   e       f   2   3  \n   f   i   e   l
        040 040 166 141 154 165 145 040 146 062 063 012 146 151 145 154
0000160    3364    2020    6176    756c    2065    3366    0a31    000a
          d   3           v   a   l   u   e       f   3   1  \n  \n
        144 063 040 040 166 141 154 165 145 040 146 063 061 012 012
0000177
ubuntu@ubuntu:/mnt/coding/awk$ 

Other:

awk -F"\t" 'NR==FNR{a[$1] = a[$1]", "$2; print "["$1"/"$2"]"; next}{gsub("^,","",a[$1]);print $1"\t"a[$1]}' f2.txt f1.txt
[field1  value f11/]
[field1  value f12/]
[field1  value f13/]
[field2  value f21/]
[field2  value f22/]
[field2  value f23/]
[field3  value f31/]
[/]
field1  
field2  
field3  
field9  
share|improve this question
    
That script won't do what you want but neither will it produce NO output given those 2 input files so there must be something about the input files that you misunderstand or aren't telling us. –  Ed Morton Mar 20 '13 at 3:16
1  
What is the purpose of file1.txt? It doesn't seem to actually contribute anything. –  Jim Garrison Mar 20 '13 at 3:26
    
file1 may have fields which are not in file2. i want those as empty –  user1865341 Mar 20 '13 at 3:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's one possible solution:

NR==FNR{a[$1]=a[$1]", "$2;next}{gsub("^,","",a[$1]);print $1"\t"a[$1]}

This works by storing the keys and values in file2 first, then processing file1 to output them. The following (slightly formatted) transcript shows this in action:

pax> cat file1.txt

field1
field2
field3
field9

pax> cat file2.txt

field1  value f11
field1  value f12
field1  value f13
field2  value f21
field2  value f22
field2  value f23
field3  value f31

pax> awk -F"\t" 'NR == FNR{
...>                 a[$1] = a[$1]", "$2;
...>                 next
...>             }
...>             {
...>                 gsub ("^,", "", a[$1]);
...>                 print $1"\t"a[$1]
...>             }' file2.txt file1.txt 

field1   value f11, value f12, value f13
field2   value f21, value f22, value f23
field3   value f31
field9

Based on your update where I suggested you use the sed command print "["$1"/"$2"]" and you got:

[field1  value f11/]
[field1  value f12/]
[field1  value f13/]
[field2  value f21/]
[field2  value f22/]
[field2  value f23/]
[field3  value f31/]

that indicates that those fields are not tab-separated. This is also confirmed by the output of the od command where you can clearly see th e 2020 two-space sequence.

You need to sort that out or the commands won't work with -F"\t". For example, if I replace each tab in my file2.txt with a space, I see what you're seeing:

pax> awk -F"\t" 'NR==FNR{a[$1] = a[$1]", "$2;next}
...>   {gsub("^, ","",a[$1]);print $1"\t"a[$1]}' file2.txt file1.txt 
field1  
field2  
field3  
field9  

So, you need to make a decision, either:

  • modify the file so that it is tab-separated; or
  • modify the awk options to work with the actual file format.

Given you have spaces elsewhere on the line, the first option is probably the easiest. To modify the file to replace the first group of spaces on each line with a tab, you can use:

sed 's/  */\t/' file2.txt >file2a.txt
mv file2a.txt file2.txt                 # once you're happy.

(or use the -i inplace editing option of GNU sed).

share|improve this answer
    
i don't know whats wrong i tried your thing and i get this field1 field2 field3 –  user1865341 Mar 20 '13 at 3:25
    
@user1865341, you need to re-examine your input files to ensure they meet the spec (eg, od -xcb file2.txt). You also need to check that you're using a decent awk implementation (eg, awk --version). FWIW, I'm running GNU Awk 3.1.7. –  paxdiablo Mar 20 '13 at 3:26
    
I have updated the question with my output , can you have a look what can be wrong –  user1865341 Mar 20 '13 at 3:31
    
@user1865341, show the output of od -xcb fX.txt where X is 1 and 2. Also in the NR==FNR code, put print "["$1"/"$2"]";` as the first statement and see what comes out. –  paxdiablo Mar 20 '13 at 4:35
    
i have updated the question with info –  user1865341 Mar 20 '13 at 4:46

Using other tools instead of awk (and assuming there's a tab to separate fields from values in file2):

for f in `cat /tmp/file1.txt`; do grep $f /tmp/file2.txt | cut -f2- | paste -s -d, | sed "s/^/$f\t/g" ; done

(I'd have posted this as a comment but it doesn't seem to be possible to escape backticks in comments)

share|improve this answer
    
You can get back ticks into comments by using, for example, two or more back ticks together, then the code you want: var=`ls` if you see what I mean. You can't have a space between the opening back ticks and the text that follows. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 20 '13 at 5:03
    
@JonathanLeffler Ah cheers. –  therefromhere Mar 20 '13 at 6:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.