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I am wondering if there is a way to create a temp variable in the parameter list of a custom control structure.

Essentially, I would like create a control structure that looks something like the for loop where I can create a variable, i, and have access to i in the loop body only:

for(i<- 1 to 100) {
   //loop body can access i here
}
//i is not visible outside

I would like to do something similar in my code. For example,

customControl ( myVar <- "Task1") {
    computation(myVar)
}

customControl ( myVar <- "Task2") {
    computation(myVar)
}
def customControl (taskId:String) (  body: => Any) = {
    Futures.future {
        val result = body

        result match {
            case Some(x) =>
                logger.info("Executed successfully")
                x
            case _ =>
                logger.error(taskId + " failed")
                None
        }

    }
}

Right now, I get around the problem by declaring a variable outside of the custom control structure, which doesn't look very elegant.

val myVar = "Task1"
customControl {
    computation(myVar)
}

val myVar2 = "Task2"    
customControl {
    computation(myVar2 )
}
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It should be possible to write a macro to do this using untyped macros. I don't have time to write it now, but the basic idea would be to have a macro with two parameter lists which would rewrite into a single block placing the binding at the start of the second block. I started doing something simple called scala-where which might give you an idea of where to start. –  Impredicative Mar 20 '13 at 11:40
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

import scala.actors.Futures

def custom(t: String)(f: String => Any) = {
  Futures.future {
    val result = f(t)

    result match {
      case Some(x) =>
        println("Executed successfully")
        x
      case _ =>
        println(t + " failed")
        None
    }

  }
}

And then you can get syntax like this, which isn't exactly what you asked for, but spares you declaring the variable on a separate line:

scala> custom("ss") { myvar => println("in custom " + myvar); myvar + "x" }
res7: scala.actors.Future[Any] = <function0>
in custom ss
ss failed

scala> custom("ss") { myvar => println("in custom " + myvar); Some(myvar + "x") }
in custom ss
Executed successfully
res8: scala.actors.Future[Any] = <function0>

scala> 
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Note that the built-in for (x <- expr) body is just syntactic sugar for

expr foreach (x => body)

Thus it might be possible to achieve what you want (using the existing for syntax) by defining a custom foreach method.

Also note that there is already a foreach method that applies to strings. You could do something like this:

case class T(t: String) {
  def foreach(f: String => Unit): Unit = f(t)
}

Note: You can also change the result type of f above from Unit to Any and it will still work.

Which would enable you to do something like

for (x <- T("test"))
  print(x)

This is just a trivial (and useless) example, since now for (x <- T(y)) f(x) just abbreviates (or rather "enlongishes") f(y). But of course by changing the argument of f in the above definition of foreach from String to something else and doing a corresponding translation from the string t to this type, you could achieve more useful effects.

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