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In javascript I can create a property of object with get/set methods :

 function Field(arg){
  var value = arg;
     //Create a read only property “name”
    Object.defineProperty(this, "value", {           
    get: function () {
        return value;
    },
    set: function () {
        console.log("cannot set");
    }
   });

}

var obj = new Field(10);    
console.log(obj.value); // 10
obj.value = 20;         // "cannot set"

Setting "value" property is disallowed here.

In typescript if I want to achieve the same behaviour I would have to do this (as suggested by link ):

class Field{
    _value:number;
    constructor(arg)
    {
        this._value = arg;
    }
    get value(){
        return this._value;
    }

    set value(){
        console.log("cannot set");
    }
}

var obj = new Field(10);
console.log(obj.value); // 10
obj.value = 20;         // "cannot set"
obj._value = 20;        // ABLE TO CHANGE THE VALUE !
console.log(obj.value); // 20

But the promblem as you see here is that the so-called private property "_value" can be accessed/changed by the user directly without going through get/set methods for "value". How do I restrict the user from accessing this property ( _value) directly ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use Object.defineProperty in TypeScript as well.

I've modified your Field class like:

class Field{
    value: any;
    constructor(arg: any)
    {
        var value = arg;
        Object.defineProperty(this, "value",{           
            get: () => {
                return value;
            },
            set: function () {
                console.log("cannot set");
            }
        });
    }
}

Note that you cannot use the value defined on the class itself, otherwise the getter of the field would be recursively called until you'd run into a Maximum call stack size exceeded. The value:any declaration on the class definition avoids the compiler error:

the property "value" does not exist on value of type Field

You can then execute this TypeScript code to get the same results as your JavaScript code example:

var obj = new Field(10);
console.log(obj.value);
obj.value = 20;
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1  
Precisely what I wanted ! Thanks. –  FacePalm Mar 20 '13 at 9:04
1  
+1 Nice solution. –  JcFx Mar 20 '13 at 9:17

Within TypeScript it should be as simple as adding the private modifier (in your example, _value is public):

private _value:number;

... the compiler should now prevent you from setting the property from outside the class:

var obj = new Field(10);
obj._value = 20; // Error: The property '_value' does not exist on value of type 'Field'.

But this doesn't hide _value in the same way in the output JS. TypeScript private members are private only within TS. See this answer and the interesting codeplex discussion it links to.

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In my case, I don't want _value to be accessed in JS as well. Thanks. –  FacePalm Mar 20 '13 at 9:36

If you don't create a variable, it will not be accessible:

class Field{
    get value(){
        return 10;
    }

    set value(){
        console.log("cannot set");
    }
}

var obj = new Field();
console.log(obj.value); // 10
obj.value = 20;  // cannot set
console.log(obj.value); // 10 

Ofcourse I would recommend removing the set all-together:

class Field{
    get value(){
        return 10;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Basarat, appreciate your prompt responses. I think I didn't make my question clear. Edited it just now. Please have a look again. –  FacePalm Mar 20 '13 at 6:00

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