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I have a jquery script which converts the options of a dropdown select box to ul list items using an array. Each option in the dropdown has a numerical option value, e.g.

<option value="12">Size S</option>
<option value="34">Size M</option>
<option value="7">Size L</option>

which get converted to a list like

<ul>
<li class="opt_12">Size S</li>
<li class="opt_34">Size M</li>
<li class="opt_7">Size L</li>
</ul>

In Firefox everything works as expected and the list items appear in the same order as the dropdown options. However IE and Chrome seem to sort the option values of the array automatically by option value in descending order. So instead of size order S,M,L,XL like in the dropdown, in Chrome & IE I get a list with something like XL,M,S,L.

I noticed one thing: When I use var options = Array; to construct the array, Firefox displays the list elements in the right order and Chrome and IE the wrong one. When I use var options = [];, all three tested browsers display the list in the wrong order.

Below is the relevant code of the script which I use to transform the dropdown into list items:

(function($) {
    $.fn.visualAttribute = function(options) {
        var defaults = {
            useTitle: false,
            attrClicked : function(data) {
                return true;
            },
            attrUpdated : function(data) {
            }
        };
        var settings = $.extend(defaults, options);

        //loop all attributes
        var selectbox_counter = 0;
        return this.each(function() {
            //use counter for a unique class for each wrapper
            selectbox_counter++;

            //store reference to attribute selectbox
            var selectbox = $(this);

            //hide the default dropdown (but keep it in dom for posting the required values)
            $(this).css('position', 'absolute').css('left', '-100000px').show();

            //insert wrapper for options
            var wrapper = $('<ul />')
                    .attr("class", "la_wrapper")
                    .attr("id", "la_wrapper_" + selectbox_counter)
                    .appendTo($(this).parent());

            $(this).parent().append('<div style="clear:both"></div>');

            if (selectbox.attr("id") != "") {
                wrapper.attr("rel", selectbox.attr("id"));
            }

            //store all values of the dropdown in an array
            var options = [];
            var option_counter = 0;
            var description = '';

            selectbox.children('option').each(function() {
                option_counter++;

                if (option_counter == 1) {
                    //first option contains the description, e.g. 'please select size'
                    description = $(this).text();
                }

                //only use option if has a value
                var value = $(this).val();
                if (value != '') {
                    options[value] = ({value : value, text : $(this).text()});
                }
            });

            //loop all stored options and create custom html
            if (options.length) {
                for (var index in options) {
                    if (!isNaN(index)) {
                        var value = index;
                        var text = options[index].text;
                        if (!settings.useTitle) {
                            description = '';
                        }
                        wrapper.append('<li title="' + description + '" class="opt_' + value + '"><a href="#' + value + '">' + text + '</a></li>');
                    }
                }
            }

            //set custom options to same value as current selectbox value (only needed in rare cases)
            var current_value = selectbox.val();
            if (current_value > 0) {
                $("#la_wrapper_" + selectbox_counter + ' li.opt_' + current_value + ' a').addClass('selected');
            }

            //event handler for catching a clicked attribute
            $("#la_wrapper_" + selectbox_counter + ' li a').click(function() {

                var value = $(this).attr("href").split('#')[1];

                //use callback
                if (!settings.attrClicked(options[value])) {
                    return false;
                }

                //set value and class
                selectbox.val(value);
                $("#la_wrapper_" + selectbox_counter + ' .selected').removeClass('selected');
                $(this).addClass('selected');

                //use callback
                settings.attrUpdated(options[value]);

                return false;
            });
        });
    };
    })(jQuery);

How can I prevent IE and Chrome from "autosorting" the array and keep/transfer the original order of the dropdown options in the resulting list?

share|improve this question
    
You want to use array.push, like I point out in my answer... ;) –  nbrooks Mar 20 '13 at 5:34
    
OK thanks for the advice, I will try that and come back tomorrow with the result (2:40 am here) :) –  Socrates Mar 20 '13 at 5:38
    
I can confirm that your solution works perfectly, thanks again! –  Socrates Mar 20 '13 at 5:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the order is important, don't use the value of the option as the array key, just do an append (P.S. use [], not Array—that isn't doing what you think it's doing)

var options = [];
var option_counter = 0;
var description = '';

selectbox.children('option').each(function() {
    option_counter++;

    //only use option if has a value
    var value = $(this).val();
    if ( value ) {
        options.push({value : value, text : $(this).text()});
    }
});

Then, when looping, get rid of the if (options.length) altogether, and use a regular for loop:

for (var i=0; i<options.length; i++) {
    var value = options[i].value;
    var text = options[i].text;
    if (!settings.useTitle) {
        description = '';
    }
    wrapper.append('<li title="' + description +
                   '" class="opt_' + value +
                   '"><a href="#' + value + '">' + text +
                   '</a></li>');
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think they want to preserve the order - they said How can I prevent IE and Chrome from "autosorting" the array and keep the original order of the dropdown options?. To me, that means they need an array, not an object –  Ian Mar 20 '13 at 5:15
    
@Ian You're right, I was focusing on the fact that OP was trying to use value as the key in the array, and thinking he was getting values sorted but not the text, causing the problem. But I think your interpretation is right. –  nbrooks Mar 20 '13 at 5:17
    
Just wanted to point it out :) I know you included both suggestions. Either way, there's a lot of things wrong with the code, and I'm not 100% sure about several expectations –  Ian Mar 20 '13 at 5:20
    
The code above is not my work (I am just starting out with JS :)) and I stripped out some parts which I did not consider important, I will edit the post to include the original code. –  Socrates Mar 20 '13 at 5:34
1  
@nbrooks You sir, are a hero!! I can`t thank you enough, I have spent the last two days trying to fix this. I just tested your code and it works perfectly! Stackoverflow is simply the best community out there :) –  Socrates Mar 20 '13 at 5:54

Your problem is that options is not an array like you think.

You did not create a new array there, you are assigning to Array function object, so in essence you are assigning to an object.

to create a new array you might use one of these. Pick one. I like []:

var options = Array();
var options = [];
var options = new Array();

Your sorting is broken because Objects are not guaranteed to have the same order of key/value pairs as insertion order. Its up to the browser to decide what order they loop in, and each does it differently (as you found)

share|improve this answer
    
@nbrooks Good point, I think that's what their last paragraph was trying to explain, but didn't provide a solution for it –  Ian Mar 20 '13 at 5:20
    
@mkoryak I tried var options =[]; already with the result that none of the three browsers displayed the original order, all of them sorted by option value in descending order. I will test your other suggestions. –  Socrates Mar 20 '13 at 5:22
    
@nbrooks: unless his keys are not numbers, it should work. tried on FF: >>> a = []; a['0'] = "a"; a['1'] = "b"; a [ "a" , "b" ] –  mkoryak Mar 20 '13 at 5:23
1  
@Socrates Like I said, fixing your array declaration is only half the problem. You also need to use it like an array :) –  nbrooks Mar 20 '13 at 5:24
    
ok, ill take 1/2 of a vote –  mkoryak Mar 20 '13 at 5:24

When you iterate an array with this:

for (var index in options) 

you are not getting a guaranteed order as you are just iterating properties of an object (not array indexes) which by specification have no guaranteed order. You should be using this:

for (var i = 0; i < options.length; i++)

to iterate an array in the array order. The first form iterates properties of an object in no particular order. The latter form iterates array elements in array index order (which gives you the actual array elements in their array order).

In addition, you declare an array with this:

var options = [];

or

var options = new Array();

You should not be using:

var options = Array;
share|improve this answer

Your problem is that you're using for...in to enumerate the properties.

Enumeration order for properties of an object (including an array) is undefined in ECMAScript so far. There is a proposal for ECMAScript 6 to define the order as follows, more or less: "first all properties whose names look like integers, in numeric order, then all other properties in the order they were added". This is the behavior Chrome and IE implement. The Firefox behavior is somewhat complicated and depends on whether your object is an array or not and if it's an array on which exact property names got used and in what order and what the length of the array is and a few other things.

In any case, if you want to enumerate the values in order, just store them in an array using array.push() and then enumerate the array's indices. So replace options[value] = ... with options.push(...) and replace for (var index in options) with for (var index = 0; index < options.length; ++index) and get the value from options[index].value just like you get the text already.

share|improve this answer

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