Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using MinGW on Windows. I am building linked list and I am confused with this.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct Data
{
    int x;
    int y;
    struct BlaBla * next;               /*compiles with no problem*/
}List;

int main(void)
{
    List item;
    List * head;
    head = NULL;
    return 0;
}

I now that struct can't have struct variable(object, instance of that struct), but can have pointer of that struct type. Didn't know that pointer can be pointer of unexisting type. struct BlaBla * next;(not for linked list, it must be struct Data * next but mean general talking)

share|improve this question
5  
I believe these are called "incomplete types". –  Mysticial Mar 20 '13 at 5:24
    
struct BlaBla must be defined somewhere in your program...it compiles because it sees it as user defined type and not go further for definition......but when you try to use it in your program it will give you error as it will not be able to find the members of the struct blabla. –  Kinjal Patel Mar 20 '13 at 5:29
3  
@KinjalPatel It will compile. –  user529758 Mar 20 '13 at 5:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, you can, because then the compiler, upon encountering the unknown type name for the first time, assumes that there's somehwere a struct type definition with this name. Then it will forward-declare the struct name for you, let you use it as a pointer, but you can't dereference it nor can you do pointer arithmetic on it (since it's an incomplete type).

share|improve this answer
    
ok, glad I know now –  balky Mar 20 '13 at 5:36
    
@balky You're welcome. –  user529758 Mar 20 '13 at 5:36

The compiler will accept code such as your example:

typedef struct Data
{
    int x;
    int y;
    struct BlaBla * next;               /*compiles with no problem*/
}List;

This is okay because the size of pointers is known to the compiler, and the compiler is assuming that the struct will be defined before it is dereferenced.

Because the compiler acts this way, it's possible to do this:

typedef struct Data
{
    int x;
    int y;
    struct Data * next;     /* points to itself */
} List;

However, if you were to include the struct inline, like this:

typedef struct Data
{
    int x;
    int y;
    struct BlaBla blaStruct;               /* Not a pointer. Won't compile. */
}List;

The compiler can't work out how big struct Data is because it doesn't know how big struct BlaBla is. To get this to compile, you need to include the definition of struct BlaBla.

Note that, as soon as you need to access the members of struct BlaBla, you will need to include the header file that defines it.

share|improve this answer

It depends on what you mean by "unexisting". If you haven't even declared BlaBla, you'll get an error.

If you've declared it but not yet defined it, that will work fine. You're allowed to have pointers to incomplete types.

In fact, that's the normal way of doing opaque pointers in C.

So, you might think that this is invalid because there's no declaration of struct BlaBla in scope:

typedef struct Data {
    struct BlaBla *next;  // What the ??
} List;

However, it's actually okay since it's both declaring struct BlaBla and defining next at the same time.

Of course, since definition implies declaration, this is also okay:

struct BlaBla { int xyzzy; };
typedef struct Data {
    struct BlaBla *next;  // What the ??
} List;
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I am by no means a C standard expert, and I fear to question you, but if I run clang -Wall -std=c99 -pedantic on this code, I don't even get a warning. –  user529758 Mar 20 '13 at 5:29
1  
struct BlaBla *next; declares both stuct BlaBla and the member next—it's not an error even if struct BlaBla has never been declared before. –  Adam Rosenfield Mar 20 '13 at 5:29

In order to declare a variable or field of a given type, pass one as a parameter, or copy one to another of the same type, the compiler has to know how many bytes the variable or field occupies, what alignment requirements it has (if any), and what other pointer types it's compatible with, but that's all the compiler needs to know about it. In all common dialects of C, a pointer to any structure will always be the same size and require the same alignment, regardless of the size of the structure to which it points or what that structure may contain, and pointers to any structure type are only compatible with other pointers to the same structure type.

Consequently, code which doesn't need to do anything with pointers to a structure except allocate space to hold the pointers themselves [as opposed to the structures at which they point], pass them as parameters, or copy them to other pointers, doesn't need to know anything about the structure type to which they point beyond its unique name. Code which needs to allocate space for a structure (as opposed to a pointer to one) or access any of its members must know more about its type, but code which doesn't do those things doesn't need such information.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.