Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I found this code for quicksort with a fixed pivot. It always takes a right-hand side element of the given table as a pivot. I want it to take a random element as a pivot. I think that x is a pivot here, so I thought it was a good idea to change it to a random element from a given list, but it turns out that it is not working.

void swap ( int* a, int* b )
{
    int t = *a;
    *a = *b;
    *b = t;
}


int partition (int arr[], int l, int h)
{
    int x = arr[h];
    int i = (l - 1);
    for (int j = l; j <= h- 1; j++)
    {
        if (arr[j] <= x)
        {
            i++;
            swap (&arr[i], &arr[j]);
        }
    }
    swap (&arr[i + 1], &arr[h]);
    return (i + 1);
}

void quickSortIterative (int arr[], int l, int h)
{
    int stack[ h - l + 1 ]; 
    int top = -1;

    stack[ ++top ] = l;
    stack[ ++top ] = h;

    while ( top >= 0 )
    {
        h = stack[ top-- ];
        l = stack[ top-- ];

        int p = partition( arr, l, h );

        if ( p-1 > l )
        {
            stack[ ++top ] = l;
            stack[ ++top ] = p - 1;
        } 
        if ( p+1 < h )
        {
            stack[ ++top ] = p + 1;
            stack[ ++top ] = h;
        }
    }
}

I tried changing lines

int x = arr[h];

and

swap(&arr[i+1], &arr[j]);

to

int r = l+rand()%(h-l);
int x = arr[r];

and then

swap(&arr[i+1], &arr[r]);

but it is not sorting properly. Obviously I'm doing something wrong here. Please help.

share|improve this question
    
Any reason why recursion is replaced with the use of variable-length arrays? It's not going to save you from stack overflows. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 20 '13 at 6:21
    
@Alexey Frunze It is my college exercise. I am supposed to compare different kinds of quicksorts. No problems with recursive one (either with fixed and random pivot), but iterative was a problem to implement for me. I ended up using someone else's code and that resulted in not understanding it. –  raven_raven Mar 20 '13 at 6:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your partition function assumes the pivot is at the end of the partition. Consider moving your random pivot to the end of the partition first.

i.e. add

swap(&arr[r], &arr[h]);

after choosing your pivot.

share|improve this answer

The problem is that the 'partition' function now moves the pivot so it doesn't remain at the r index. And the function also misses the last element (at index h). The simplest solution would be to place the pivot to the right-most position just after selecting it, and remain everything other the same: put swap(&arr[r], &arr[h]); before the first loop in partition(), and restore the last swap to swap (&arr[i + 1], &arr[h]);

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.