Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am iterating over polygon flags. I have 128 unique of tham. I wonder how to get for each a distingushable color (so that each flag would have its more or less distingushable color)? How to get such RGB ints from one int?

Having a frame based model stuff like rand()%255, rand()%255, rand()%255 does not make mush sense, while store colors fore each veriable is not what I intend. 255-i variations does not provide distingushable results. So I seek for an algorithm to get distingushable color from given i.

I have an iterator i and unsigned long long 128 bit mask (0001, 0010, 0100...).

share|improve this question
5  
What have you tried so far? –  rhughes Mar 20 '13 at 8:16
1  
128 colors distinguishable by the eye? You might be able to do that when you put any two different colors side by side, but you may fail to distinguish two different hues of blue when presented sequentially instead of simultaneously. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 20 '13 at 8:19

6 Answers 6

128 numbers is 7 bits worth of data. I would divide up the 7 bits into (2, 2, 3) and use those (in some order) as the high-order bits for red, green, and blue. That should spread out the colors as much as possible in the RGB color space.

share|improve this answer
8  
AFAIK, human eye is most sensitive to green color. Therefore I would rather choose (2, 3, 2) over (2, 2, 3) (if that's a RGB). –  Spook Mar 20 '13 at 8:22
    
Indeed I have an iterator i and also an unsigned long long mask. –  DuckQueen Mar 20 '13 at 8:25
    
@Spook - Good point about perceptual distance. My "in some order" parenthetical was because I wasn't sure about which color should get three bits. Green seems like the best choice. –  Ted Hopp Mar 20 '13 at 8:29

Simply using a grid r=4, g=8, b=4 is easy, but does not necessarily generate the best output, as there should be less different hues in the dark colors.

Processing in Lab-space would have the most equal perceptual distance between each unit, but I believe reasonable alternatives can be found from YUV or HSV.

Just from evaluating the heuristics / results from other answers (I'll try to find the best duplicate from gamedeveloper site), I think best results come other lattices than cubical.

   X   X   X
 X   X   X   X  <-- e.g. sampling points from hexagonical grid in HSV cone
   X   x   X    for some intensity level L.
 X   X   X   X
   X   X   X

The typical mistake IMO, is to align the next level L+-1 equally to L; Instead if the sampling points in the next intensity level L+-1 were rotated (by 45 degrees), there would be a difference in both hue and intensity of nearby colors. Another name for the idea is to give good hamming distance to nearby colors.

     x   x  L&1==0,    x    L&1==1
       *             x   x
     x   x             x

Also in the HSV cone there would be one black, one white, three hues in dark colors, three hues in bright colors, 6 or 12 colors in the next intensity level etc.

The second excellent remark in the game-dev answer was cultural bias. I would state the concept rather as that we give meanings to certain colours and can be very good in differentiating the color of sage from olive, or lavender from fuchsia.

EDIT The first answer in the link has 173 up-votes, even though e.g. I can't differentiate the colors 5 and 6. And there are only 10 colors. But the theory claims to be sound.

share|improve this answer

Generating a palette of optimally distinct colors is not easy. Since you say you need a fixed number of colors you can just pregenerate one, for example here:

http://tools.medialab.sciences-po.fr/iwanthue/

share|improve this answer
    
That page confirms my concerns about distinguishability. If it is at all possible, I'd encode part of the information in the shape or size of those 128 unique polygons or use a set of patterns (image) instead of just solid colors. Say, 12 patterns + 12 distinct colors, that's 144 unique combinations. Or one non-symmetric pattern using two colors, each from a set of 12 (black+white, black+yellow, red+white, blue+yellow, etc). –  Alexey Frunze Mar 20 '13 at 9:54

It depends on how distinct you want the follows.

If you are finding that creating the colors at runtime is too difficult, how about creating a lookup of pre-defined colors in a pallet that you know are distinct?

share|improve this answer
    
That is main problem - nice gradient is not what I need I need distingushable colors between first and second and thisd ... and last color... as much as possible. –  DuckQueen Mar 20 '13 at 8:23
    
@DuckQueen updated answer –  rhughes Mar 20 '13 at 8:26
    
@DuckQueen updated answer again –  rhughes Mar 20 '13 at 8:28

If you really need to generate these, rather than use a pre-generated palette, I would at least suggest not working in RGB.

For example, the Lab colour space is more closely related to the human visual system, and so might be more appropriate when trying to find perceptually distinct colours.

So you might try to generate colours which are far apart in Lab, and then convert back to RGB.

share|improve this answer

how about this:

int get_red(int rep){
    int x,r=0,i,temp;
    i=0;
    temp=rep;
    while(temp!=0){
        i++;
        if(i==3) r=temp%2;
        temp=temp/2;
    }
    if(i>3) x=(long long int)255/(i-2);
    else x=255;
    temp=r*x;
    return temp;

}

int get_green(int rep){
    int x,g=0,i,temp;
    i=0;
    temp=rep;
    while(temp!=0){
        i++;
        if(i==2) g=temp%2;
        temp=temp/2;
    }
    if(i>3) x=(long long int)255/(i-2);
    else x=255;
    temp=g*x;
    return temp;
}

int get_blue(int rep){
    long long int x,b=0,i,temp;
    i=0;
    temp=rep;
    while(temp!=0){
        i++;
        if(i==1) b=temp%2;
        temp=temp/2;
    }
    if(i>3) x=(int)255/(i-2);
    else x=255;
    temp=b*x;
    return temp;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.