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I'm just starting out with Django, using PyDev in AptanaStudio3. I used the helpful Django tutorials to build the backbone of my simple project. Now I am trying to use css for some basic formatting and coloring, but have spent quite a while struggling.

The html page is still showing up fine. It just isn't grabbing the css (404). I know this from the console:

[20/Mar/2013 12:41:51] "GET /signup/ HTTP/1.1" 200 306
[20/Mar/2013 12:41:51] "GET /signup/static/signup.css HTTP/1.1" 404 2750

My file structure:

Learning
- Learning
--- templates
----- 404.html
----- 500.html
--- _init.py
--- settings.py
--- urls.py
--- wsgi.py
- signup
--- static
----- signup.css
--- templates
----- signup
------- detail.html
------- index.html
------- results.html
----- __init__.py
----- admin.py
----- models.py
----- tests.py
----- urls.py
----- view.py
--- manage.py
--- sqlite.db
--- python

In settings:

STATIC_ROOT = ''
STATIC_URL = 'static/'
STATICFILES_DIRS = ('')
STATICFILES_FINDERS = (
    'django.contrib.staticfiles.finders.FileSystemFinder',
    'django.contrib.staticfiles.finders.AppDirectoriesFinder',
)

In my html template:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>User List</title>
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ STATIC_URL }}signup.css" />
...

In views.py:

def ip_address_processor(request):
    return {'ip_address': request.META['REMOTE_ADDR']}
def index(request):
    user_list = User.objects.order_by('name')[:5]
    template = loader.get_template('signup/index.html')
    context = RequestContext(
                             request,
                             {'user_list': user_list,},
                             [ip_address_processor])
    return HttpResponse(template.render(context))

Any insights?

share|improve this question
1  
Did you run ./manage.py collectstatic ? Django needs all static files to be collected in a directory to serve them using the test server. Also, be sure to set your STATIC_ROOT setting to an absolute and writable path, so that the files can effectively be collected. For more information, see the Django documentation on static files. Also, remember that in production environment, static files should be served directly by the HTTP server. –  pistache Mar 20 '13 at 8:36
1  
Also, your CSS file is retrived at the path /signup/static/signup.css, while your STATIC_URL is /static/. You need to make that path absolute, and not relative to your page. Either change to href="/{{ STATIC_URL }}signup.css", or use the {% static 'signup.css' %} template tag provided by the staticfiles library (better !). –  pistache Mar 20 '13 at 8:43
    
@pistache (post1), No, I hadn't run that. I just did what you suggested, didn't fix it. I'll update the file structure in a second. –  bhekman Mar 20 '13 at 8:44
    
@pistache (post2) Brilliant! The STATIC_URL path was the problem. I made it absolute, and magic happened. Many thanks! (Also, if you make that comment a formal answer, I will happily accept it) –  bhekman Mar 20 '13 at 8:47
1  
@pistache that is not correct, collectstatic is only for deployment, not development. –  Burhan Khalid Mar 20 '13 at 8:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • Your STATIC_URL is a relative path (static/), which means that all static files will be searched relative to the current page. Django's test server does not expect this behaviour, and so static URLs will not be matched, triggering the 404 error. You need to make that path absolute, and not relative to your page (/static/, for example)

  • When using Django's staticfiles system with the testserver, you need to collect your static files using ./manage.py collectstatic

  • I also strongly recommend using the {% static 'signup.css' %} syntax rather than {{ STATIC_URL }}signup.css . Note that if you use this alternate format, you need to include {% load static %} somewhere earlier in the file.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why do you recommend the alternate format so strongly? –  bhekman Mar 20 '13 at 9:41
    
This was a bit exaggerate from me. The Django documentation recommends using the staticfiles module, and in my humble opinion, as this is the standard way of doing it, you should do it this way. Of course it's the same result, but I like conventions and clarity. –  pistache Mar 20 '13 at 12:07
    
By the way, your edit was a very good idea (especially because the error caused by the missing {% load staticfiles %} is not explicit at all). It got rejected by other users before I could accept it, which shows how many SO users are reviewing edits without looking. I'll add it myself, thanks. –  pistache Mar 20 '13 at 12:12

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