Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I almost understand how tail recursion works and the difference between it and a normal recursion. I only don't understand why it doesn't require stack to remember its return address.

// tail recursion
int fac_times (int n, int acc) {
    if (n == 0) return acc;
    else return fac_times(n - 1, acc * n);
}

int factorial (int n) {
    return fac_times (n, 1);
}

// normal recursion
int factorial (int n) {
    if (n == 0) return 1;
    else return n * factorial(n - 1);
}

There is nothing to do after calling a function itself in a tail recursion function but it doesn't make sense for me.

share|improve this question
12  
Tail recursion is "normal" recursion. It only means that the recursion occurs at the end of the function. –  Pete Becker Mar 20 '13 at 11:27
3  
... But it can be implemented in a different way at the IL level than normal recursion, reducing stack depth. –  KeithS Mar 20 '13 at 14:17
2  
BTW, gcc can perform tail recursion elimination on the "normal" example here. –  dmckee Mar 20 '13 at 16:58
    
In reference to my above comment, see stackoverflow.com/a/3679409/2509 . –  dmckee Mar 20 '13 at 17:05
1  
@ShannonSeverance I found that gcc is doing it by the simple expedient examining the emitted assembly code with without -O3. The link is for an earlier discussion that covers very similar ground and discusses what is necessary to implement this optimization. –  dmckee Mar 27 '13 at 23:42

6 Answers 6

up vote 132 down vote accepted

The compiler is simply able to transform this

int fac_times (int n, int acc) {
    if (n == 0) return acc;
    else return fac_times(n - 1, acc * n);
}

into something like this:

int fac_times (int n, int acc) {
label:
    if (n == 0) return acc;
    acc *= n--;
    goto label;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's exactly what I was going to write. Thanks for saving me the trouble. :) (+1) –  NPE Mar 20 '13 at 9:13
1  
@Mr.32 I don't understand your question. I converted the function into an equivalent one but without explicit recursion (that is, without explicit function calls). If you change the logic into something non-equivalent, you may indeed make the function loop forever in some or all cases. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 20 '13 at 9:30
12  
So tails recursion is effective only because of compiler optimising it? And otherwise it would be the same as a normal recursion in terms of stack memory wise? –  Marius Kavansky Mar 20 '13 at 9:48
25  
Yep. If the compiler cannot reduce recursion to a loop, you are stuck with recursion. All or nothing. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 20 '13 at 9:57
3  
@AlanDert: correct. You can also consider tail recursion to be a special case of the "tail call optimization", special because the tail call happens to be to the same function. In general, any tail call (with the same requirements on "no work left to do" as apply to tail recursion, and where the return value of the tail call is directly returned) can be optimized if the compiler can make the call in a way that sets up the return address of the called function to be the return address of the function making the tail call, instead of the address from which the tail call was made. –  Steve Jessop Mar 20 '13 at 9:59

You ask why "it doesn't require stack to remember its return address".

I would like to turn this around. It does use the stack to remember the return address. The trick is that the function in which the tail recursion occurs has its own return address on the stack, and when it jumps to the called function, it will treat this as it's own return address.

Concretely, without tail call optimization:

f: ...
   CALL g
   RET
g:
   ...
   RET

In this case, when g is called, the stack will look like:

   SP ->  Return address of "g"
          Return address of "f"

On the other hand, with tail call optimization:

f: ...
   JUMP g
g:
   ...
   RET

In this case, when g is called, the stack will look like:

   SP ->  Return address of "f"

Clearly, when g returns, it will return to the location where f was called from.

EDIT: The example above use the case where one function calls another function. The mechanism is identical when the function calls itself.

share|improve this answer
6  
This is a much better answer than the other answers. The compiler most likely doesn't have some magical special case for converting tail recursive code. It just performs a normal last call optimization that happens to go to the same function. –  Art Mar 20 '13 at 12:10

Tail recursion can usually be transformed into a loop by the compiler, especially when accumulators are used.

// tail recursion
int fac_times (int n, int acc = 1) {
    if (n == 0) return acc;
    else return fac_times(n - 1, acc * n);
}

would compile to something like

// accumulator
int fac_times (int n) {
    int acc = 1;
    while (n > 0) {
        acc *= n;
        n -= 1;
    }
    return acc;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Not as clever as Alexey's implementation... and yes that's a compliment. –  Matthieu M. Mar 20 '13 at 9:38
1  
Actually, the result looks simpler but I think the code to implement this transformation would be FAR more "clever" than either label/goto or just tail call elimination (see Lindydancer's answer). –  Phob Mar 22 '13 at 6:28
    
If this is all tail recursion is, then why do people get so excited about it? I don't see anyone getting excited about while loops. –  Buh Buh Nov 24 '13 at 17:54

There are two elements that must be present in a recursive function:

  1. The recursive call
  2. A place to keep count of the return values.

A "regular" recursive function keeps (2) in the stack frame.

The return values in regular recursive function are composed of two types of values:

  • Other return values
  • Result of the owns function computation

Let's see your example:

int factorial (int n) {
    if (n == 0) return 1;
    else return n * factorial(n - 1);
}

The frame f(5) "stores" the result of it's own computation (5) and the value of f(4), for example. If i call factorial(5), just before the stack calls begin to colapse, i have:

 [Stack_f(5): return 5 * [Stack_f(4): 4 * [Stack_f(3): 3 * ... [1[1]]

Notice that each stack stores, besides the values i mentioned, the whole scope of the function. So, the memory usage for a recursive function f is O(x), where x is the number of recursive calls i have to made. So, if i needb 1kb of RAM to calculate factorial(1) or factorial(2), i need ~100k to calculate factorial(100), and so on.

A Tail Recursive function put (2) in it's arguments.

In a Tail Recursion, i pass the result of the partial calculations in each recursive frame to the next one using parameters. Let's see our factorial example, Tail Recursive:

int factorial (int n) { int helper(int num, int accumulated) { if num == 0 return accumulated else return helper(num - 1, accumulated*num) } return helper(n, 1)
}

Let's look at it's frames in factorial(4):

[Stack f(4, 5): Stack f(3, 20): [Stack f(2,60): [Stack f(1, 120): 120]]]]

See the differences? In "regular" recursive calls the return functions recursively compose the final value. In Tail Recursion they only reference the base case (last one evaluated). We call accumulator the argument that keeps track of the older values.

Recursion Templates

The regular recursive function go as follows:

type regular(n)
    base_case
    computation
    return (result of computation) combined with (regular(n towards base case))

To transform it in a Tail recursion we:

  • Introduce a helper function that carries the accumulator
  • run the helper function inside the main function, with the accumulator set to the base case.

Look:

type tail(n):
    type helper(n, accumulator):
        if n == base case
            return accumulator
        computation
        accumulator = computation combined with accumulator
        return helper(n towards base case, accumulator)
    helper(n, base case)

See the difference?

Tail Call optimization

Since no state is being stored on the Non-Border-Cases of the Tail Call stacks, they aren't so important. Some languages/interpreters then substitute the old stack with the new one. So, with no stack frames constraining the number of calls, the Tail Calls behave just like a for-loop in these cases.

It's up to your compiler to optimize it, or no.

share|improve this answer
    
best answer hands down. –  decentralised May 4 at 12:41

Here is a simple example that shows how recursive functions work:

long f (long n)
{

    if (n == 0) // have we reached the bottom of the ocean ?
        return 0;

    // code executed in the descendence

    return f(n-1) + 1; // recurrence

    // code executed in the ascendence

}

Tail recursion is a simple recursive function, where recurrence is done at the end of the function, thus no code is done in ascendence, which helps most compilers of high-level programming languages to do what is known as Tail Recursion Optimization, also has a more complex optimization known as the Tail recursion modulo

share|improve this answer

My answer is more of a guess, because recursion is something relating to internal implementation.

In tail recursion, the recursive function is called at the end of the same function. Probably compiler can optimize in below way:

  1. Let the ongoing function wind up (i.e. used stack is recalled)
  2. Store the variables which are going to be used as arguments to the function in a temporary storage
  3. After this, call the function again with the temporarily stored argument

As you can see, we are winding up the original function before the next iteration of the same function, so we are not actually "using" the stack.

But I believe if there are destructors to be called inside the function then this optimization may not apply.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.