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This question already has an answer here:

 #include <iostream> // cin, cout
using namespace std;
int main(void)
{
char c[80];
int i, sum=0;
cin.getline(c,80);
for(i=0; c[i]; i++) // c[i] != '\0'
if('0'<=c[i] && c[i]<='9') sum += c[i]-'0';
cout<< "Sum of digits = " << sum << endl;
getchar();
getchar();
return 0;
}

I understand everything accept for the sum += c[i] - '0'; i removed the "-'0'" and it didn't give me the correct answer. Why is this?

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marked as duplicate by ecatmur, Synxis, billz, Toto, Zdeslav Vojkovic Mar 20 '13 at 9:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
look ASCII table, you will find something helpful. – billz Mar 20 '13 at 9:35
    
I wouldn't say that this is an exact duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/11098626/understanding-c-0 . That one is about 'a' - '0', which is mostly nonsensical coincidence and is character-set dependent. This question is about subtracting '0' from '0' .. '9', which I believe is well-defined. Now, it's true that some of the explanations there are generally applicable to this one, but they're different questions. – jamesdlin Mar 20 '13 at 10:25

This converts a character from its character code(which is 48 in ASCII for instance) to its integer equivalent. Thus it turns the character '0' to the value 0 as integer. As Pete Becker noted in a comment in the language definitions of both C and C++ it is required that all number characters are consecutive.

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Wow, so many highly detailed wrong answers! <g> (I'd have posted this as an answer if the question wasn't closed) It has nothing to do with ASCII (well, not directly). The C and C++ language definitions require that '0'-'9' have values that are contiguous and ascending. That makes ch - '0' work; otherwise there would be no simple, sane mechanism for converting characters that represent digits to the values that they represent. It works for every valid character encoding, not just ASCII. – Pete Becker Mar 20 '13 at 11:22

'0' returns the ASCII value of 0. Therefore to use the numbers and not their ASCII values, you need to offset by the ASCII value of 0. '1' - '0' ::= 49 - 48 ::= 1 (49 and 48 are respectively ASCII values for 1 and 0).

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The ascii value for 0 is 48, for 1 its 49 and so on. Now in your program c[80] is an array of characters. So if you input 1 from the keyboard, the compiler treats it as 49 (the ascii value) for the arithmetic operation. That's why we need to subtract the ascii value of 0 (i.e 48) to get the integer equivalent. this can be achieved either by subtracting '0' from the character or by subtracting 48 directly. e.g. if you replace sum += c[i]-'0'; by sum += c[i]-48;, the code will also work. But this is not a good practice. Hope this helps.

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It converts a character to the integer value:

character | ASCII code  | expression | equivalent | result
  '0'     |      48     | '0' - '0'  |  48 - 48   |   0
  '1'     |      49     | '1' - '0'  |  49 - 48   |   1
  '2'     |      50     | '2' - '0'  |  50 - 48   |   2
  '3'     |      51     | '3' - '0'  |  51 - 48   |   3
  '4'     |      52     | '4' - '0'  |  52 - 48   |   4
  '5'     |      53     | '5' - '0'  |  53 - 48   |   5
  '6'     |      54     | '6' - '0'  |  54 - 48   |   6
  '7'     |      55     | '7' - '0'  |  55 - 48   |   7
  '8'     |      56     | '8' - '0'  |  56 - 48   |   8
  '9'     |      57     | '9' - '0'  |  57 - 48   |   9
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