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I have a broadcastreceiver called by an Alarm (scheduled with AlarmManager). In this receiver I'm only querying a register from the database, and launching a notification. I readed that a wake lock is needed when a service or an activity is started from a broadcast receiver, but, do I need a wake lock if I only want to show a notificacion (in the notification panel)?

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up vote 13 down vote accepted

In this receiver I'm only querying a register from the database, and launching a notification.

Do not do database I/O on the main application thread.

I readed that a wake lock is needed when a service or an activity is started from a broadcast receiver, but, do I need a wake lock if I only want to show a notificacion (in the notification panel)?

In general, no, you would not need a WakeLock from a BroadcastReceiver, even one that is invoked via a _WAKEUP alarm. AlarmManager guarantees in this case that it will keep the device awake using its own WakeLock.

However, again, in this case, you really should not be doing database I/O on the main application thread, and onReceive() is called on the main application thread. The proper pattern here is that you move your "querying a register from the database, and launching a notification" to an IntentService, started by your BroadcastReceiver, so that the work is done on a background thread. This will require a WakeLock, as you are now doing work outside of onReceive(). I have a WakefulIntentService that manages the WakeLock for you, if you wish to use it.

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Thanks! You answered all my questions about it :) I'll take a look at your WakefulIntentService to do all the work in an IntentService, and using a WakeLock. – Sergio Viudes Mar 20 '13 at 13:07
    
correct me if i'm wrong, but i think there is a chance that the device goes back to sleep while the BroadCastReceiver's onReceive() has finished, but your WakefulIntentService isn't started yet or hasn't acquired a wakelock yet, therefore i'd suggest to simply use a WakefulBroadcastReceiver (was added to the support library after the accepted answer): developer.android.com/reference/android/support/v4/content/… – Su-Au Hwang Jul 27 '13 at 18:57
    
@Su-AuHwang: "correct me if i'm wrong" -- you are wrong. WakefulIntentService is specifically designed for this scenario. "therefore i'd suggest to simply use a WakefulBroadcastReceiver" -- there are pros and cons for each approach; there is nothing intrinsically wrong with either of them. – CommonsWare Jul 27 '13 at 19:10
    
@CommonsWare, shouldnt WAKE_LOCK be required in every case when i start a service? Why only in some special cases? The CPU can go to sleep in any case. – Diffy May 12 '15 at 13:51
    
@Diffy: "shouldnt WAKE_LOCK be required in every case when i start a service?" -- only if you need the CPU to stay awake. "The CPU can go to sleep in any case" -- correct. Not every service needs the CPU to stay awake. And since keeping the CPU awake drains the battery, causing users to consider attacking offending developers with torches and pitchforks, we only use a WakeLock when absolutely required. – CommonsWare May 12 '15 at 14:11

Yes, it is necessary. I remember that in the Kernel level, the CPU will be kept running for about 5 seconds. So if you cannot finishing send your notification within 5 seconds, you have to grasp a wake lock. And release it after you finished your work.

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Thanks for your answer. Only one question more: do I need to start a service? or can I do the work on the receiver? – Sergio Viudes Mar 20 '13 at 11:24
    
Downvote because BroadcastReceiver cannot do hard work (just a few seconds, so 5 seconds is really fine). If you want to do hard work, start a service. – Jorge Fuentes González Jul 2 '13 at 10:28

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