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I am executing most of the queries based on the time. So i created index for the created time. But , The index only works , If I select the indexed columns only. Is mysql index is dependant the selected columns?.

My Assumption On Index

I thought index is like a telephone dictionary index page. Ex: If i want to find "Mark" . Index page shows which page character "M" starts in the directory. I think as same as the mysql works.

Table

+--------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| Field        | Type         | Null | Key | Default | Extra          |
+--------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+
| ID           | int(11)      | NO   | PRI | NULL    | auto_increment |
| Name         | varchar(100) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| OPERATION    | varchar(100) | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| PID         | int(11)      | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
| CREATED_TIME | bigint(20)   | YES  |     | NULL    |                |
+--------------+--------------+------+-----+---------+----------------+

Indexes On the table.

    +-----------+------------+----------+--------------+--------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+---------------+
| Table     | Non_unique | Key_name | Seq_in_index | Column_name  | Collation | Cardinality | Sub_part | Packed | Null | Index_type | Comment | Index_comment |
+-----------+------------+----------+--------------+--------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+---------------+
| IndexTest |          0 | PRIMARY  |            1 | ID           | A         |       10261 |     NULL | NULL   |      | BTREE      |         |               |
| IndexTest |          1 | t_dx     |            1 | CREATED_TIME | A         |         410 |     NULL | NULL   | YES  | BTREE      |         |               |
+-----------+------------+----------+--------------+--------------+-----------+-------------+----------+--------+------+------------+---------+---------------+

Queries Using Indexes:

   explain select * from IndexTest where ID < 5;
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table     | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | IndexTest | range | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 4       | NULL |    4 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+------+-------------+



  explain select CREATED_TIME from IndexTest where CREATED_TIME > UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE())*1000;
    +----+-------------+-----------+-------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table     | type  | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | IndexTest | range | t_dx          | t_dx | 9       | NULL | 5248 | Using where; Using index |
+----+-------------+-----------+-------+---------------+------+---------+------+------+--------------------------+

Queries Not using Indexes

    explain select count(distinct(PID)) from IndexTest where CREATED_TIME > UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE())*1000;
+----+-------------+-----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table     | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | IndexTest | ALL  | t_dx          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 10261 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+


    explain select PID from IndexTest where CREATED_TIME > UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE())*1000;
+----+-------------+-----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table     | type | possible_keys | key  | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | IndexTest | ALL  | t_dx          | NULL | NULL    | NULL | 10261 | Using where |
+----+-------------+-----------+------+---------------+------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
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indexing helps speed the search for that particular column and associated data rather than the table data. So you have to include the indexed column to speed up select – Ajo Koshy Mar 20 '13 at 10:35

Is mysql index is dependant the selected columns?.

Yes, absolutely.

For example:

MySQL cannot use the index to perform lookups if the columns do not form a leftmost prefix of the index. Suppose that you have the SELECT statements shown here:

SELECT * FROM tbl_name WHERE col1=val1;
SELECT * FROM tbl_name WHERE col1=val1 AND col2=val2;

SELECT * FROM tbl_name WHERE col2=val2;
SELECT * FROM tbl_name WHERE col2=val2 AND col3=val3;

If an index exists on (col1, col2, col3), only the first two queries use the index. The third and fourth queries do involve indexed columns, but (col2) and (col2, col3) are not leftmost prefixes of (col1, col2, col3).

Have a read through the extensive documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
SELECT * FROM tbl_name WHERE col1=val1;. This select query fetches five columns in the table. But , It does not form the left most prefix but how the index is used here. This query uses index . explain select * from IndexTest where ID < 5; – kannanrbk Mar 20 '13 at 10:51
    
@bharathi: The optimiser may be kicking in, especially as you [appear to] have so few rows. Trying to rationalise about this sort of behaviour is often a fool's errand. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 20 '13 at 10:57
    
Thank you. "Trying to rationalise about this sort of behaviour is often a fool's errand". How can we write query without understanding on it. – kannanrbk Mar 20 '13 at 11:06
    
@bharathi You may understand the query just fine. You may follow the rules for indexing as laid out in the documentation. Just don't be surprised when sometimes the optimiser allows a query to perform better than expected. – Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 20 '13 at 13:01
    
I never knew that that. I just re-confirmed it with EXPLAIN. – georgecj11 Mar 26 '13 at 17:12

Short answer: No.

Whether indexes are used depends on the expresion in your WHERE clause, JOINs etc, but not on the columns you select.

But no rule without an exception (or actually a long list of those):

Long answer: Usually not

There are a number of factors used by the MySQL Optimizer in order to determine whether it should use an index.

The optimizer may decide to ignore an index if...

  • another (otherwise non-optimal) saves it from accessing the table data at all
  • it fails to understand that an expression is a constant
  • its estimates suggest it will return the full table anyway
  • if its use will cause the creation of a temporary file
  • ... and tons of other reasons, some of which seem not to be documented anywhere

Sometimes the choices made by said optimizer are... erm... lets call them sub-optimal. Now what do you do in those cases?

  • You can help the optimizer by doing an OPTIMIZE TABLE and/or ANALYZE TABLE. That is easy to do, and sometimes helps.
  • You can make it use a certain index with the USE INDEX(indexname) or FORCE INDEX(indexname) syntax
  • You can make it ignore a certain index with the IGNORE INDEX(indexname) syntax

More details on Index Hints, Optimize Table and Analyze Table on the MySQL documentation website.

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Actually, it makes no difference wether you select the column or not. Indexes are used for lookups, meaning for reducing really fast the number of records you need retrieved. That makes it usually useful in situations where: you have joins, you have where conditions. Also indexes help alot in ordering.

Updating and deleting can be sped up quite alot using indexes on the where conditions as well.

As an example:

table: id int pk ai, col1 ... indexed, col2 ...
select * from table -> does not use a index
select id from table where col1 = something -> uses the col1 index although it is not selected.

Looking at the second query, mysql does a lookup in the index, locates the records, then in this case stops and delivers (both id and col1 have index and id happens to be pk, so no need for a secondary lookup).

Situation changes a little in this case:

select col2 from table where col1 = something

This will make internally 2 lookups: 1 for the condition, and 1 on the pk for delivering the col2 data. Please notice that again, you don't need to select the col1 column to use the index.

Getting back to your query, the problem lies with: UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE())*1000; If you remove that, your index will be used for lookups.

share|improve this answer
    
He has a second index in his question on col CREATED_TIME, and the value you refer to is part of a where clause checking on this column and only this column. Shouldn't the second index be used for that query? It appears it should at least be eligible, and perhaps another discussion here about the Query Planner is the issue. – Chris Moschini Mar 31 '13 at 22:02

for mysql query , the answer is yes, but not all

the query:

explain select * from IndexTest where ID < 5;

use the table cluster index if you use innodb, its table's primary key, so it use primary for query

the second query:

select CREATED_TIME from IndexTest where CREATED_TIME > UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE())*1000;

this one is just fetch the index column that mysql does not need to fetch data from table but just index, so your explain result got "Using Index"

the query:

select count(distinct(PID)) from IndexTest where CREATED_TIME > UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE())*1000;

it look like this

select PID from IndexTest where CREATE_TIME>UNIX_TIMESTAMP(CURRENT_DATE())*1000 group by PID

mysql can use index to fetch data from database also, but mysql thinks this query it no need to use index to fetch data, because of the where condition filter, mysql thinks that use index fetch data is more expensive than scan all table, you can use force index also

the same reason for your last query

hopp this answer can help you

share|improve this answer

indexing helps speed the search for that particular column and associated data rather than the table data. So you have to include the indexed column to speed up select.

share|improve this answer
    
That is in no way shape or form correct. The columns selected are data. The indexes are something completely differend and they will be used if the query optimizer thinks it will yeld a benefit irrelevant of wether you select the column or not. – Xnoise Mar 31 '13 at 2:53
    
This is technically true in the case of Covering Indexes, but in MySQL it appears Covering Indexes are extremely rudimentary - they're identical to regular indexes, they just happen to index every single column you had in your select statement, which in MySql means they contain a full copy of the data in those columns and the actual table isn't necessary to answer the query. dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/… – Chris Moschini Mar 31 '13 at 22:09

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