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I need a HashSet that preserves insertion ordering, are there any implementations of this in the framework?

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1  
I imagine you mean like Java's LinkedHashSet –  thejoshwolfe Dec 10 '11 at 18:31
1  
yeah the simplest thing to do is to wrap a linked list and hashset together ... its what I ended up doing in the past. useful for an LRU implementation –  Sam Saffron Dec 11 '11 at 2:10
    
By definition of Set should not preserve any order. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Jul 25 '13 at 10:50
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@vash In lieu of that remark, the question should then really be "I need a data structure that preserved insertion order and that has access characteristics of a hashset, ie. O(1) etc." –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jul 25 '13 at 15:05
    
@SamSaffron Hi Sam, have you tried out my suggestion! Could you consider accepting it if it worked for you. –  achitaka-san Aug 30 '13 at 8:50

3 Answers 3

Standard .NET HashSet do not preserve the insertion order. For simple tests the insertion order may be preserved due to an accident, but it's not guaranteed and would not always work that way. To prove that it is enough to do some removals in between.

See this question for more information on that: Does HashSet preserve insertion order?

I have briefly implemented a HashSet which guarantees insertion order. It uses the Dictionary to look up items and the LinkedList to preserve order. All three insertion, removal and lookup work still in O(1).

public class OrderedSet<T> : ICollection<T>
{
    private readonly IDictionary<T, LinkedListNode<T>> m_Dictionary;
    private readonly LinkedList<T> m_LinkedList;

    public OrderedSet()
        : this(EqualityComparer<T>.Default)
    {
    }

    public OrderedSet(IEqualityComparer<T> comparer)
    {
        m_Dictionary = new Dictionary<T, LinkedListNode<T>>(comparer);
        m_LinkedList = new LinkedList<T>();
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return m_Dictionary.Count; }
    }

    public virtual bool IsReadOnly
    {
        get { return m_Dictionary.IsReadOnly; }
    }

    void ICollection<T>.Add(T item)
    {
        Add(item);
    }

    public bool Add(T item)
    {
        if (m_Dictionary.ContainsKey(item)) return false;
        LinkedListNode<T> node = m_LinkedList.AddLast(item);
        m_Dictionary.Add(item, node);
        return true;
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        m_LinkedList.Clear();
        m_Dictionary.Clear();
    }

    public bool Remove(T item)
    {
        LinkedListNode<T> node;
        bool found = m_Dictionary.TryGetValue(item, out node);
        if (!found) return false;
        m_Dictionary.Remove(item);
        m_LinkedList.Remove(node);
        return true;
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return m_LinkedList.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public bool Contains(T item)
    {
        return m_Dictionary.ContainsKey(item);
    }

    public void CopyTo(T[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        m_LinkedList.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }
}
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1  
The OP does not state that HashSet<T> preserves order...in fact they stated it does not. Who exactly are you disagreeing with? –  user7116 Jul 25 '13 at 14:48
    
Other answers which were high rated stating that ordering is given "out of box". Now these are downrated. I will modify my text and rephrase it neutrally. –  achitaka-san Jul 25 '13 at 14:57
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You should really provide an overload taking an IEqualityComparer<T> to pass to the same overload of IDictionary<T>. Out of the box, your example check equality through object references (for classes, at least) and offers no options to change that behaviour. I understand however that this is a simple example. –  Simon Belanger Jul 25 '13 at 16:57
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@SimonBelanger Agree. I have just posted a version which implements all variants of common constructors and methods here: gmamaladze.wordpress.com/2013/07/25/… –  achitaka-san Jul 25 '13 at 22:29

You can get this functionality easily using KeyedCollection<TKey,TItem> specifying the same type argument for TKey and TItem:

public class OrderedHashSet<T> : KeyedCollection<T, T>
{
    protected override T GetKeyForItem(T item)
    {
        return item;
    }
}
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1  
When you call Remove will it call Remove(T) or Remove(TKey)? The first is O(n) and the second is O(1). –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 26 '14 at 22:11
1  
It calls Remove(TKey) because it is the one on the most derived class. However, calling Remove() when the collection is cast as a Collection<T> or ICollection<T> will call the Remove(T) overload. –  kevo Feb 26 '14 at 22:53
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Another clarification: Both Remove(T) and Remove(TKey) are O(n) because KeyedCollection<T, T> uses a list to store the items. –  kevo Feb 27 '14 at 14:51
    
Not true, by default after the first entry it builds a lookup Dictionary to store the entries. You can customize the switch over from list lookups to dictionary lookups with this constructor –  Scott Chamberlain Feb 27 '14 at 14:55

In the case that the CLR lacks what you're describing (which it seems to), I wrote a Set class a while back as an intellectual excercise that seems to have the semantics you describe. No guarantees beyond that it works though.

void Main()
{
    Set<int> foo = new Set<int>();
    foo.Add(5);
    foo.Add(10);
    foo.Add(5);
    foo.Add(2);

    // Prints 5, 10, 2
    foreach(int i in foo)
    {
    	i.Dump();
    }
}
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Your implementation seems to depend on the Dictionary class iterating over keys in insertion order. I can't find anywhere that documents that the Dictionary class will do that every time, but it does seem to be the behavior. +1 –  thejoshwolfe Dec 10 '11 at 18:53
    
I am very surprised to learn that Dictionary preserves insertion order. It's unlikely that'll ever change since the team is very gun shy about any kind of breaking change, even if the behavior they're preserving is undocumented. Still doesn't seem right. I just wish they'd have done it with HashSet. –  Josh Dec 7 '12 at 19:28
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Okay - now I'm confused. HashSet is showing the same behavior under .NET 4.5. This has to be something that has changed recently because I <strike>know for a fact</strike> <ins>feel almost certain</ins> that HashSet used to not preserve insertion order. –  Josh Dec 7 '12 at 19:42
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See @Jon Skeet's answer on that: stackoverflow.com/questions/657263/… –  achitaka-san Jul 25 '13 at 8:45
2  
This answer is not valid. The Set has not any guaranty that will preserver order. For such simple example it might look like it does, but in reality it will not. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Jul 25 '13 at 10:54

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