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I am trying to parse input that looks like this:

i171_chr1_C_MSTA_K0.184_full    i266_chr1_+_MSTA_K0.195_full    92.06   2255    125 21  1   2221    2235    1   0.0 3123
i172_chr1_+_MLT1D_K0.575_full   i172_chr1_+_MLT1D_K0.575_full   100.00  2290    0   0   1   2290    1   2290    0.0 4229
i172_chr1_+_MLT1D_K0.575_full   i172_chr1_+_MLT1D_K0.575_full   100.00  2290    0   0   1   2290    1   2290    0.0 4229

Desired output is:

i171 1 i266 1 92
i172 1 i172 1 100
i172 1 i172 1 100

In another words, I am extracting name before first "_" to the first column and part after chr into second column (similiarly for third and fourth column).

I wrote command that works properly for first four columns:

grep -v "#" blastGE90_lengthGE1000 | cut -f 1,2 | sed -r 's/(.+)_chr([0-9XY]+)_.+\t(.+)_chr([0-9XY]+).+/\1 \2 \3 \4/'

However, when I try to match third column in input, I am not successful. I always match the last match instead of one I want:

grep -v "#" blastGE90_lengthGE1000 | cut -f 1,2 | sed -r 's/(.+)_chr([0-9XY]+)_.+\t(.+)_chr([0-9XY]+).+([0-9]+\.).+/\1 \2 \3 \4 \5/' 

Therefore, I would like to use regexp to match non-whitespace or tabulator, but I can't figure it out.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have fixed your command:

grep -v "#" blastGE90_lengthGE1000 | cut -f 1-3 | sed -r 's/(.+)_chr([0-9XY]+)_.+\t(.+)_chr([0-9XY]+)_.+\t([0-9]+).+/\1 \2 \3 \4 \5/'

You need to use cut -f 1-3 not cut -f 1,2 because you need the first three columns. I also fixed the last capture group in the sed expression.

share|improve this answer
    
Such a stupid mistake :( Thank you very much! – Perlnika Mar 20 '13 at 14:22

I would use awk here:

$ awk -F'_| +' '{gsub(/chr/,"");print $1,$2,$7,$8,int($13)}' file
i171 1 i266 1 92
i172 1 i172 1 100
i172 1 i172 1 100
share|improve this answer
    
Also working, thanks. Also thank you for the idea of multiple delimiters, will definitely use one day. – Perlnika Mar 20 '13 at 14:24

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