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I wrote a Matlab program to achieve the image background estimation using the two dimensional LMS (TDLMS)adaptive algorithm, according to Mohiy M. Hadhoud's paper. I initiated the weight matrix W, the estimated output matrix Y and the error matrix e with zeros. The support region is 5*5 (window size). Matrix D is the desired output, whose difference with Y is defined as the error matrix(e). However, after I ran the program, weight W and estimated output Y are all zeros. I don't know if it's because W and Y are all zeros at the beginning or there's flaw in the program. Here is my code:

clear; close all;
X=imread('noisySea.jpg');
[M N]=size(X);
Ns=5; % 5*5 support region
u=5*10^(-8); % step size
Y=zeros(M,N); % predicted image
Y(1:Ns,1:Ns)=X(1:Ns,1:Ns);
D=zeros(M,N);
D(2:M,2:N)=X(2:M,2:N); % D is shifted version of X
e=zeros(M,N); % error matrix
W=zeros(Ns,Ns); % weight matrix
for m=1+floor(Ns/2):M-floor(Ns/2)
    for n=1+floor(Ns/2):N-floor(Ns/2)
        for l=1:Ns
            for k=1:Ns
                Y(m,n)=Y(m,n)+W(l,k)*X(m-floor(Ns/2)+l-1,n-floor(Ns/2)+k-1);
                e(m,n)=D(m,n)-Y(m,n);
                W(l,k)=W(l,k)+u*e(m,n)*X(m-floor(Ns/2)+l-1,n-floor(Ns/2)+k-1);
            end
        end
    end
end
imshow(Y);

the inner two iterations are used to calculate the value of Y at point (m,n), while the outer two iterations walk through the whole image. Codes such as m=1+floor(Ns/2) are frequently used because the weight matrix (5*5) cannot fit into the image at the edges. Only the pixels whose neighbors can all be included into the weight matrix (or mask) are filtered.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, a few more things. I think you're referring to Hadhoud and Thomas' paper in the May 1988 issue of IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems, Vol 35. No. 5. I see at least a couple more errors but I only read the paper over a few minutes.

D(2:M,2:N)=X(2:M,2:N); % D is shifted version of X

You're not actually doing a shift here, in the paper there's a shift by 1 pixel in the X and Y directions.

D(2:M,2:N)=X(1:M-1,1:N-1); % D is a shiftier version of X

They also initialize the weights, W, by running the algorithm over 10 rows of the original image starting with a 0 weight matrix.

I also believe (not 100% certain yet) that your weight udpate is incorrect. Your weights are continuously updating which introduces some strange smearing into the algorithm. From my brief read of the paper the weights are only updated when your n loop iterates. The weights are also scaled so that their total sum is 1, which preserves the local mean value.

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You have a problem in your program, and the correct way to program the TDLMS is: • Filter: to calculate a scalar output Y(m,n), • Subtract the output Y(m,n) from the desired D(m,n) to calculate scalar error e(m,n) • Update the filter weights

The correct way to do the program inner calculation part is as follows:

for m=1+floor(Ns/2):M-floor(Ns/2)

for n=1+floor(Ns/2):N-floor(Ns/2)

for l=1:Ns

        for k=1:Ns

           Y(m,n)=Y(m,n)+W(l,k)*X(m-floor(Ns/2)+l-1,n-floor(Ns/2)+k-1);

        end

    end

e(m,n)=D(m,n)-Y(m,n);

        for l=1:Ns

        for k=1:Ns

         W(l,k)=W(l,k)+u*e(m,n)*X(m-floor(Ns/2)+l-1,n-floor(Ns/2)+k-1);

        end 
    end

end end

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the first problem I see is that your updates to the result, error matrix and weights never actually update. The first step is to cast X to be a double, so change the second line to:

X = cast(imread('noisySea.jpg'), 'double');

Before doing this poke around a bit and understand what's happening. For instance, regardless of what's in X:

u*e(m,n)*X(m-floor(Ns/2)+l-1,n-floor(Ns/2)+k-1) is 0.

You can break it down a bit, and just look at:

u*e(m,n) and see that it's behaving appropriately.

When you bring in references to X you end up reducing the precision to the point that 'small number' * 'largish number' is 0.

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