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I have a class 'dStructs' in which i have defined a couple of publicly accessible structs, 'entity' and 'point'. These structs are fully defined within the class brackets dStructs. I'm however unsure whether I have defined their constructors correctly. The code looks like so...

#pragma once

#include <GL/glut.h>


class dStructs 
{


public:
    struct point
    {
        GLfloat x, y;

        point()
        {

        }

        point(GLfloat aX,GLfloat aY) //constructor for point
        {
            x = aX;
            y = aY;
        }
    };

    struct entity
    {
        point pos, size;

        entity()
        {

        }

        entity(GLfloat posX, GLfloat posY, GLfloat sizeX, GLfloat sizeY)
        {
            pos = point(posX,posY);
            size = point(sizeX, sizeY);
        }

    };

static void copyPoint(point pointToCopy, point& toPoint);
static void copyEntity(entity entityToCopy, entity& toEntity);

};

I'm thinking that I've done something wrong in placing the constructor definition within the struct brakets rather than in the .cpp file. So I tried moving them out, and defining them within the .cpp like so.....

#include "dStructs.h"

dStructs::point::point()
{
}

dStructs::point::point(GLfloat aX, GLfloat aY)
{
    x = aX;
    y = aY;
}

dStructs::entity::entity()
{

}

dStructs::entity::entity(GLfloat posX, GLfloat posY, GLfloat sizeX, GLfloat sizeY)
{
    pos = point(posX,posY);
    size = point(sizeX, sizeY);
}

However, no joy, as this is caused unresolved external symbol errors wherever the structs 'point' or 'entity' were used in my code.

Can anybody see where I'm going wrong in the declaration of my structs (and their relative constructors) to get this error?

share|improve this question
    
The entire design looks a little strange to me. Why is dStructs a class rather than a namespace (if you need any kind of wrapper at all)? –  us2012 Mar 20 '13 at 12:17
    
I've used namespaces lots, but never actually created one. I never actually instantiate dStructs. It simply exists as something to contain data structures and manipulate them using static functions. Would a namespace be better than a class for this? –  Guy Joel McLean Mar 20 '13 at 12:21
    
"I never actually instantiate dStructs." <- in my opinion, that's a sign that it should not be a class. –  us2012 Mar 20 '13 at 12:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You receive multiple defines, because you have a definition in the header and in the .cpp file

Change your constructor declaration in the header to just method prototypes.

i.e.

    point() // **change this to point();**
    {//remove

    }//remove
    point(GLfloat aX,GLfloat aY) // **change this to point(GLfloat aX,GLfloat aY);**
    {//remove
        x = aX;//remove
        y = aY;//remove
    }//remove
share|improve this answer
    
After fixing the unresolved external errors, this was the obvious solution to my problem. –  Guy Joel McLean Mar 20 '13 at 18:31

However, no joy, as this is caused unresolved external symbol errors wherever the structs 'point' or 'entity' were used in my code.

That's because once you move the definition to the .cpp file, you actually have to link against the corresponding object later.

I.e. if myfile.cpp uses dStructs, you both have to include the header file (as you already do) and:

g++ -o myprog myfile.cpp dStructs.cpp

or

g++ -c myfile.cpp
g++ -c dStructs.cpp
g++ -o myprog myfile.o dStructs.o
share|improve this answer
    
Okay I understand this part now. Can you see whether my constructor declaration is correct or not? –  Guy Joel McLean Mar 20 '13 at 12:22

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