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i would like to parse a string and get the "stringIAmLookingFor"-part of it, which is surrounded by "\_" at the end and the beginning. I'm using a regex to match that and then remove the "\_" in the found string. This is working, but I'm wondering if there is a more elegant approach to this problem?

String test = "xyz_stringIAmLookingFor_zxy";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("_(\\w)*_");
Matcher m = p.matcher(test);
while (m.find()) { // find next match
    String match = m.group();
    match = match.replaceAll("_", "");
    System.out.println(match);
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can define the group you actually want, since you're already using parentheses. You just need to tweak your pattern a bit.

String test = "xyz_stringIAmLookingFor_zxy";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("_(\\w*)_");
Matcher m = p.matcher(test);
while (m.find()) { // find next match
    System.out.println(m.group(1));
}
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Solution (partial)

Please also check the next section. Don't just read the solution here.

Just modify your code a bit:

String test = "xyz_stringIAmLookingFor_zxy";

// Make the capturing group capture the text in between (\w*)
// A capturing group is enclosed in (pattern), denoting the part of the
// pattern whose text you want to get separately from the main match.
// Note that there is also non-capturing group (?:pattern), whose text
// you don't need to capture.
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("_(\\w*)_");

Matcher m = p.matcher(test);
while (m.find()) { // find next match

    // The text is in the capturing group numbered 1
    // The numbering is by counting the number of opening
    // parentheses that makes up a capturing group, until
    // the group that you are interested in.
    String match = m.group(1);
    System.out.println(match);
}

Matcher.group(), without any argument will return the text matched by the whole regex pattern. Matcher.group(int group) will return the text matched by capturing group with the specified group number.

If you are using Java 7, you can make use of named capturing group, which makes the code slightly more readable. The string matched by the capturing group can be accessed with Matcher.group(String name).

String test = "xyz_stringIAmLookingFor_zxy";

// (?<name>pattern) is similar to (pattern), just that you attach 
// a name to it
// specialText is not a really good name, please use a more meaningful
// name in your actual code
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("_(?<specialText>\\w*)_");

Matcher m = p.matcher(test);
while (m.find()) { // find next match

    // Access the text captured by the named capturing group
    // using Matcher.group(String name)
    String match = m.group("specialText");
    System.out.println(match);
}

Problem in pattern

Note that \w also matches _. The pattern you have is ambiguous, and I don't know what your expected output is for the cases where there are more than 2 _ in the string. And do you want to allow underscore _ to be part of the output?

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No, there will be no "_" in the searched string. So your solution works perfectly. Thanks! –  jan Mar 22 '13 at 7:36

Use group(1) instead of group() because group() will get you the entire pattern and not the matching group.

Reference : http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/regex/Matcher.html#group(int)

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"xyz_stringIAmLookingFor_zxy".replaceAll("_(\\w)*_", "$1");

will replace everything by this group in parenthesis

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a simpler regex, no group needed:

"(?<=_)[^_]*"

if you want it more strict:

"(?<=_)[^_]+(?=_)"
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try

    String s = "xyz_stringIAmLookingFor_zxy".replaceAll(".*_(\\w*)_.*", "$1");
    System.out.println(s);

output

stringIAmLookingFor
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