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I noticed that while the 'max' function do well on None type:

In [1]: max(None, 1)
Out[1]: 1

'min' function doesn't return anything:

In [2]: min(None, 1)
In [3]: 

Maybe it's because there is no definition for min(None, 1)? So why in max case, it return the number? Is None treated like '-infinity'?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As jamylak wrote, None is simply not printed by Python shells.

This is convenient because all functions return something: when no value is specified, they return None:

>>> def f():
...     print "Hello"
...     
>>> f()
Hello
>>> print f()  # f() returns None!
Hello
None

This is why Python shells do not print the None value. print None is different, though, as it explicitly asks Python to print the None value.


As for comparisons, None is not considered to be -infinity.

The general rule for Python 2 is that objects that cannot be compared in any meaningful way don't raise an exception when compared, but instead return some arbitrary result. In the case of CPython, the arbitrary rule is the following:

Objects of different types except numbers are ordered by their type names; objects of the same types that don’t support proper comparison are ordered by their address.

Python 3 raises an exception, for non-meaningful comparisons like 1 > None and the comparison done through max(1, None).


If you do need -infinity, Python offers float('-inf').

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So, why max(None,1) return 1 ? it's arbitrary? –  mclafee Mar 20 '13 at 12:47
1  
Note that this rule only applies to Python 2. In Python 3 it's fixed and you get a meaningful error message unorderable types: int() < NoneType(). @mclafee They both returned a value, if you read EOLs explanation it's very clear –  jamylak Mar 20 '13 at 12:57
1  
@mclafee: max(None, 1) is undefined indeed. The "order by type name" rule for CPython 2 that I quoted does not seem to apply to the comparison between an integer and None, because None is of type 'NoneType', which comes after 'int'. Maybe the second rule does apply, though (in a test I did id(1) > id(None) was True). –  EOL Mar 20 '13 at 12:59
    
@EOL: i'm not sure wat you testing in "id(1) > id(None)"? id return object id. I tried to test "type(1) > type(None)" which is False... –  mclafee Mar 20 '13 at 13:25
    
@mclafee: id() returns, in CPython, the address of an object, which is the way some objects are compared in CPython (docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#id). –  EOL Mar 20 '13 at 14:13

If you really want a value that is always going to compare less than any other, you need to create a little class:

class ValueLessThanAllOtherValues(object):
    def __cmp__(self, other):
        return -1

# really only need one of these
ValueLessThanAllOtherValues.instance = ValueLessThanAllOtherValues()

This class will compare against values of any other type:

tiny = ValueLessThanAllOtherValues.instance
for v in (-100,100,0,"xyzzy",None):
    print v
    print v > tiny
    print tiny < v
    # use builtins
    print min(tiny,v)
    print max(tiny,v)
    # does order matter?
    print min(v,tiny)
    print max(v,tiny)
    print

Prints:

-100
True
True
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
-100
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
-100

100
True
True
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
100
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
100

0
True
True
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
0
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
0

xyzzy
True
True
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
xyzzy
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
xyzzy

None
True
True
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
None
<__main__.ValueLessThanAllOtherValues object at 0x2247b10>
None

tiny is even less than itself!

print tiny < tiny
True
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It is not exactly true that your ValueLessThanAllOtherValues is smaller than anything else. For instance, any other class defined in the same way yields objects that are smaller, when put on the left side of a comparison. The reason is that the __cmp__() of the first object in the comparison is called first (so your __cmp__() might not get called). –  EOL Mar 20 '13 at 14:20
    
Great fleas have little fleas upon their backs to bite 'em, And little fleas have lesser fleas, and so ad infinitum. –  Paul McGuire Mar 20 '13 at 14:31

It does return something, the python shell just doesn't print None

>>> min(None, 1)
>>> print min(None, 1)
None
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