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I have the following classes

Child class:

public class ChildClass
{
   ...
   private void EventHandler(...);
   ...
}

Parent class:

public class ParentClass
{
   ...
   ChildClass child;
   ...
   private void EventHandler(...);
   ...
}

Both of them have an event handlers on the same event.

The question is in which order those handlers will be called?

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Where do you hook up the event handlers to the event? –  Nick Mar 20 '13 at 13:08
    
@Nick both classes are hooking this event. –  Alex Mar 20 '13 at 13:09
3  
How about using your debugger and finding it out? –  Uwe Keim Mar 20 '13 at 13:09
    
Not quite what I asked... –  Nick Mar 20 '13 at 13:10
4  
@UweKeim: Using the debugger you can find out what happens to be the current implementation. Referencing the docs you can learn what is the guaranteed behavior. –  Jon Mar 20 '13 at 13:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Important note

Servy has very correctly pointed out that we cannot rule out the possibility that the event in question is owned by a third party and it implements the accessors itself. If that is the case then all bets are off.

The original answer below silently assumes that we are talking about a bog-standard, totally uninteresting event implementation.

Original answer

Events are implemented through delegates.

From MSDN:

A useful property of delegate objects is that multiple objects can be assigned to one delegate instance by using the + operator. The multicast delegate contains a list of the assigned delegates. When the multicast delegate is called, it invokes the delegates in the list, in order.

So the handlers are invoked in the order that you add them to the event.

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Events can be implemented through delegates, but there is nothing forcing events to be implemented through delegates. For an event not implemented through a delegate the invocation order could be something entirely different. –  Servy Mar 20 '13 at 14:20

The order in which the delegates are subscribed to, although since it's not properly noted anywhere in the specification (that I know of) that this is expected behaviour, specifically, then relying on such order could be folly, as it could change per implementation.

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1  
It is noted in the docs, so it most certainly could not change -- at least any more than e.g. Microsoft could decide that starting tomorrow, (put your preferred method here) will be taking its arguments in a different order. Instant breakage of previously-working code throughout the world = not something you do if it can be avoided at all. –  Jon Mar 20 '13 at 13:14
    
@Jon Unless a collection of things is explicitly documented to be in reliable, predictable order, then it can't be trusted; this is, in fact, mentioned in your answer so there's little risk (in an MS implementation), but this kind of expecation has been known to sting people before. –  Grant Thomas Mar 20 '13 at 13:23
    
My point is that it is explicitly documented. If you know the order in which the handlers are wired up, you also know the order they will be invoked in. –  Jon Mar 20 '13 at 13:26
1  
In two parts: a) events are implemented with delegates, b) the only method that can "add" delegates explicitly specifies the order of delegates in the resulting multicast delegate. If someone (e.g. Mono) does it differently, then their implementation is clearly not conformant. –  Jon Mar 20 '13 at 13:38
2  
@Jon That assumes the event uses a multicast delegate as the backing storage. If the event doesn't use the built in add/remove methods and instead provides it's own it can use whatever storage mechanism it wants, and it may or may not maintain the same ordering. Since this is an event and not a delegate the order of invocation can in fact change without needed a change in the language specs or implementation, merely a modification of the definition of that class. –  Servy Mar 20 '13 at 14:15

it will be called int the order they are registered.

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While the MSDN documentation clearly states that the multicast delegates invokes the delegates in the order in which they subscribed, that assumes that the subscription order is deterministic, i.e. that you are in a single-threaded environment.

If that is not the case, you may be better off defining two events: a BeforeEventOccurs event and an AfterEventOccurs event. This will give you deterministic control over the order even in a multi-threaded environment.

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According to this question event handlers get called in the order they are subscribing to the event.

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From Delegates

Delegates are used to pass methods as arguments to other methods. Event handlers are nothing more than methods that are invoked through delegates. You create a custom method, and a class such as a windows control can call your method when a certain event occurs.

From How to: Combine Delegates (Multicast Delegates) page;

A useful property of delegate objects is that multiple objects can be assigned to one delegate instance by using the + operator. The multicast delegate contains a list of the assigned delegates. When the multicast delegate is called, it invokes the delegates in the list, in order.

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