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I have the following code:

try {
    /* etc. 1 */
} catch (SomeException e) {
    /* etc. 2 */
} catch (SomeException e) {
    /* etc. 3 */
} finally {
    /* 
     * do something which depends on whether any exception was caught,
     * but should only happen if any exception was caught.
     */

    /* 
     * do something which depends on whether an exception was caught and
     * which one it was, but it's essentially the same code for when no
     * exception was caught.
     */
}

So, I want to keep my caught exception. Any way to do this other than assigning to a variable in every catch block?

Edit: Just to clarify, please don't post answers suggesting I use a variable scoped outside the try block. I know I can do that, the whole point of this question is finding an alternative.

Now, what I would really like to have is more flexible catch block, so that multiple catch blocks could catch the same exception, e.g. catch(Exception e) would catch everything even if it was already caught, catch(Exception e) except(NullPointerException, IllegalArgumentException) would skip the excepts. And a catch block could do catchingcontinue; to skip all other catch blocks for the same try block and catchingbreak; to skip even the finally.

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I don't see any way of doing this except having a boolean flag somewhere. unless someone else knows a better way. –  greenkode Mar 20 '13 at 13:21
6  
If you are trying to avoid duplicating code in the catch blocks, I would recommend switching over to Java 7 and using the multiple exception catch block syntax. –  Perception Mar 20 '13 at 13:24
    
@Perception Problem with that is that because he's got exception specific code, he'd have to have instanceof checks in the multi catch blocks. –  sharakan Mar 20 '13 at 18:43
    
@Perception: sharakan is right. I need to run some code for some exceptions, and some code for all exceptions, and some code in the finally and they can't even really be separated. –  einpoklum Mar 20 '13 at 19:48

4 Answers 4

Try this:

try {
    // your code throwing exceptions
} catch (Exception e) { // This catch any generic Exception
    // do whatever you want to do with generic exception
    ...
    if (e instanceof SomeException) {
        ...
    } else if (e instanceof OtherException) {
        ...
    }
}

using java 7 you can even do this:

try {
    // your code throwing exceptions
} catch (SomeException|OtherException e) { // This catch both SomeException and OtherException
    // do whatever you want to do with generic exception
    ...
    if (e instanceof SomeException) {
        ...
    } else if (e instanceof OtherException) {
        ...
    }
}
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Is this good practice? –  einpoklum Mar 20 '13 at 14:11
    
@einpoklum I think so ;) instanceof is not the best way to do somthing but I think this sample of code is easily readable. In my opinion you need to use the finally block only if you want to execute always a pice of code, but you need to do this only in case of exception –  Alepac Mar 20 '13 at 14:26
    
Do not do this. If you want to do separate things for separate exceptions catch them in separate blocks. If you want to do the same thing for a few exceptions no need to check the instance of. –  Thihara Mar 26 '13 at 7:14

Keep a variable outside the scope of the catch block and assign it in the catch block.

Buy I strongly recommend that you do not do this.

Finally block should be used for resource cleanup or any similar functionality that need to be run regardless of the exceptions.

All the exception handling should be done in the catch blocks, not the finally blocks.

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Keeping a variable is what I said I wanted to avoid. As for your advice - I agree, but what do I do with my scenario? I don't have fall-throughs in catching exceptions. –  einpoklum Mar 20 '13 at 14:13
    
Why do you want to avoid the final block? Handle the exception you catch, if you catch seperate exceptions like NumberFormat, IndexOutOfBounds etc, you should handle them accordingly, or the generic catch with the Exception should handle everything (or the leftovers from the more explicit catch blocks) –  Thihara Mar 20 '13 at 14:23

You will need to assign it to a variable outside the try-catch block and use it on the finally block.

Exception caughtException = null;

try {
    /* etc. 1 */
} catch (SomeException e) {
    caughtException= e;
} catch (SomeOtherException e) {
    caughtException= e;
} finally {
    if (caughtException != null) {
        /* 
         * do something which depends on whether any exception was caught,
         * but should only happen if any exception was caught.
         */
    }
}

Looks like you want to do some auditing. Why don't you use some annotations and AOP to handle the behavior, of course with a good exception handling to catch those exceptions on the before or after.

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What I would recommend here is that you extract the details of the exception handling out to new methods, and call those methods from catch blocks that are as specific as necessary to avoid instanceof checks. This has the advantage of not using instanceof, keeping exception handling code in catch blocks instead of in finally, and clearly separating shared exception handling code from specific exception handling code. Yes, there's some shared code between the three catch blocks, but it's a single clear line of code, which seems acceptable to me.

try {
    // do work that uses resources and can generate any of several exceptions
} catch (SomeException1 e) {
    standardExceptionHandler(e);
    specificExceptionHandler1(e);
} catch (SomeException2 e) {
    standardExceptionHandler(e);
    specificExceptionHandler2(e);
} catch (Exception e) {
    standardExceptionHandler(e);
} finally {
    // this would include only code that is needed to cleanup resources, which is
    // what finally is supposed to do.
}
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