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When calling a generic method for storing an object there are occasionally needs to handle a specific type differently. I know that you can't overload based on constraints, but any other alternative seems to present its own problems.

public bool Save<T>(T entity) where T : class
{ ... some storage logic ... }

What I would LIKE to do is something like the following:

public bool Save<SpecificClass>(T entity)
{ ... special logic ... }

In the past our team has created 'one-off' methods for saving these classes as follows:

public bool SaveSpecificClass(SpecificClass sc)
{ ... special logic ... }

However, if you don't KNOW that function exists, and you try to use the generic (Save) then you may run into a host of problems that the 'one-off' was supposed to fix. This can be made worse if a new developer comes along, sees the problem with the generic, and decides he's going to fix it with his own one-off function.

So...

What are the options for working around this seemingly common issue?

I've looked at, and used UnitOfWork and right now that seems to be the only option that actually resolves the problem - but seems like attacking a fly with a sledgehammer.

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2  
Unlike C++, C# doesn't allow template specialization –  Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 20 '13 at 13:40
    
Are these Save() methods placed in some lightweight helper class or in some entity classes? I'm just thinking about inheritance but it is important to be sure this is right way because inheritance not always used properly –  sll Mar 20 '13 at 13:45
    
Possible duplicate How to do template specialization in C# –  Panagiotis Kanavos Mar 20 '13 at 13:52
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You could do :

public bool Save<T>(T entity) where T : class
{ ... some storage logic ... }

public bool Save(SpecificClass entity)
{ ... special logic ... }
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This worked, I can't believe that I didn't think of this simple of a solution... –  pdench Mar 22 '13 at 16:42
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Why using different names for your method?

See the following:

    public class Entity
    {
    }

    public class SpecificEntity : Entity
    {
    }

    public class Program
    {
        public static void Save<T>(T entity)
            where T : class
        {
            Console.WriteLine(entity.GetType().FullName);
        }

        public static void Save(SpecificEntity entity)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(entity.GetType().FullName);
        }

        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Save(new Entity());          // ConsoleApplication13.Entity
            Save(new SpecificEntity());  // ConsoleApplication13.SpecificEntity

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
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Because function and operator overloads involving generics are bound at compile-time rather than run-time, if code has two methods:

public bool Save<T>(T entity) ...
public bool Save(SomeClass entity) ...

then code which tries to call Save(Foo) where Foo is a variable of some generic type will always call the former overload, even when the generic type happens to be SomeClass. My suggestion to resolve that would be to define a generic interface ISaver<in T> with a non-generic method DoSave(T param). Have the class that provides the Save method implement all of the appropriate generic interfaces for the types it can handle. Then have the object's Save<T> method try to cast this to an ISaver<T>. If the cast succeeds, use the resulting ISaver<T>; otherwise perform a generic save. Provided that the class type declaration lists all of the appropriate interfaces for the types it can save, this approach will dispatch Save calls to the proper methods.

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Well basicly C# does not allow template specialization, except through inheritence like this:

interface IFoo<T> { }
class Bar { }

class FooBar : IFoo<Bar> { }

At least it does not support this during compile time. However you can use RTTI to do what you are trying to achieve:

public bool Save<T>(T entity)
{
    // Check if "entity" is of type "SpecificClass"
    if (entity is SpecificClass)
    {
        // Entity can be safely casted to "SpecificClass"
        return SaveSpecificClass((SpecificClass)entity);
    }

    // ... other cases ...
}

The is expression is pretty handy to do runtime type checks. It works similar to the following code:

if (entity.GetType() == typeof(SpecificClass))
    // ...

EDIT : It is pretty common for unknown types to use the following pattern:

if (entity is Foo)
    return DoSomethingWithFoo((Foo)entity);
else if (entity is Bar)
    return DoSomethingWithBar((Bar)entity);
else
    throw new NotSupportedException(
        String.Format("\"{0}\" is not a supported type for this method.", entity.GetType()));

EDIT 2 : As the other answers suggest overloading the method with the SpecializedClass you need to take care if you are working with polymorphism. If you are using interfaces for your repository (which is actually a good way to design the repository pattern) there are cases where overloading would lead to cases in which you are the wrong method get's called, no matter if you are passing an object of SpecializedClass to the interface:

interface IRepository
{
    bool Save<T>(T entity)
        where T : class;
}

class FooRepository : IRepository
{
    bool Save<T>(T entity)
    {
    }

    bool Save(Foo entity)
    {
    }
}

This works if you directly call FooRepository.Save with an instance of Foo:

var repository = new FooRepository();
repository.Save(new Foo());

But this does not work if you are calling the interface (e.g. if you are using patterns to implement repository creation):

IRepository repository = GetRepository<FooRepository>();
repository.Save(new Foo());  // Attention! Call's FooRepository.Save<Foo>(Foo entity) instead of FooRepository.Save(Foo entity)!

Using RTTI there's only one Save method and you'll be fine.

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What's wrong with an overload that takes a specific type like Save(SpecificClass entity) –  Peter Ritchie Mar 20 '13 at 14:26
    
Nothing is wrong with it, but it's still an overload, not a specialization. ;) –  Aschratt Mar 20 '13 at 14:32
    
Question is about "overloading"... :) –  Peter Ritchie Mar 20 '13 at 14:38
    
Nobody has told something different... I was just answering the OP's comment "However, if you don't KNOW that function exists, and you try to use the generic (Save) then you may run into a host of problems that the 'one-off' was supposed to fix. This can be made worse if a new developer comes along, sees the problem with the generic, and decides he's going to fix it with his own one-off function.". And it works, too. It's just an alternative to the already provided answers. No need to downvote it... –  Aschratt Mar 20 '13 at 14:42
    
Also I prefer using RTTI, because it makes it easier for the developer to do it right (There is only one method to call), instead of doing it wrong (perhaps calling the wrong method). Also take a look at the question comments, because specialization is what the OP does (no matter if he asks for "overloading"). –  Aschratt Mar 20 '13 at 14:45
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