Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

Let's consider the next code:

#include <iostream>
#include "mydemangled.hpp"

using namespace std;

struct A
{
private:
    struct B {
       int get() const { return 5; }
    };

public:
   B get() const { return B(); }
};

int main()
{
    A a;
    A::B b = a.get();

    cout << demangled(b) << endl;
    cout << b.get() << endl;
}

And the compiler (gcc 4.7.2) yells saying that A::B is private. All right. So, I change the code:

int main()
{
   A a;

   cout << demangled(a.get()) << endl;
   cout << a.get().get() << endl;
}

and it doesn't yell:

$ ./a.out
A::B
5

Meaning, I can't to create instances of A::B, but I can use it. So, new change (the key of my question).

int main()
{
   A a;
   auto b = a.get();

   cout << demangled(b) << endl;
   cout << b.get() << endl;
}

And output:

$ ./a.out
A::B
5

What is the trouble here, being A::B private (and thus its constructors, copy constructors and so on)?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by R. Martinho Fernandes, Fanael, Andy Prowl, Drew Dormann, Matthieu M. Mar 20 '13 at 13:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
private is not a security feature. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 20 '13 at 13:44
    
Security of access/exposition to the exterior I mean –  Peregring-lk Mar 20 '13 at 13:45
    
That is interesting. I'm still rusty with auto - does it perhaps become a const A::B&? If it becomes A::B, how does it access the private copy constructor? –  Drew Dormann Mar 20 '13 at 13:48
3  
@Drew no, it becomes a A::B. This is not new in C++11, btw: template <typename T> int f(T t) { return t.get(); } f(a.get()); works just fine too, because the rules are the same. You just cannot name the type. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 20 '13 at 13:48
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes I learned a thing! Thanks. –  Drew Dormann Mar 20 '13 at 13:52

1 Answer 1

In general, access controls names or symbols, not the underlying entities. There are, and always have been, numerous ways of accessing private members; what you cannot do is use the name of such a member.

In your examples, you don't use the name, so there is no problem.

share|improve this answer
    
To see this even better, try doing typedef B OtherB; in the public section of A. You'll see A::OtherB is accessible from main and A::OtherB works perfectly fine. The name itself is the one that's private, the type itself is perfectly accessible. –  Zadirion Mar 20 '13 at 14:00

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.