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we have

<div class="xTable">
 <table>
  <tr>
   <td>
    <div class="xTable">
     <table>
      <tr>
       <td>
        <div class="xTable">
         <table>...</table>
        </div>
       </td>
      </tr>
     </table>    
    </div>
   </td>
  </tr>
 </table>
</div>

How do I apply custom css styles to 2nd div, only to 2nd div and not to 1 or 3 or deeper?

NO WAY TO ADD EXTRA CLASSES or IDS! Html is generated dynamically and is unmanageable.

I would use

.xTable table .xTable

but that means 3rd and deeper divs will be affected.

no IDs! Please CSS selectors only.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

To cater fully for both this default markup and browsers which correctly add a tbody where it isn't already specified you'd need to use:

body > .xTable > table > tr > td > .xTable,
body > .xTable > table > tbody > tr > td > .xTable {
    ...
}

JSFiddle example.

This assumes that your first <div class="xTable"> has no parents other than <body>. If this isn't the case then replace body with your parent.

share|improve this answer
    
so in a case of complex hierarchy I need to specify EACH child? I'll try that. Thanks – Max Grass Mar 20 '13 at 14:22
    
The > selector selects the child element and nothing deeper. body > .xTable > .xTable wouldn't work as .xTable isn't a direct child of .xTable; equally, body > .xTable > table .xTable would apply the styling to all .xTable elements contained within the first .xTable's child table (thus styling both your 2nd and 3rd .xTable elements). In order to select no deeper elements you'd have to work like this. x parent of y parent of z ... rather than x parent of y parent or grandparent of z .... – James Donnelly Mar 20 '13 at 14:28
    
thx, the idea applied, the problem solved. – Max Grass Mar 20 '13 at 14:33

I would probably just give the 2nd div an extra css class.

<div class="xTable second-xTable-div"></div>

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1  
Agreed. This is the most correct solution from a semantic markup point of view. – Adrian Mar 20 '13 at 14:12
    
html is generated dynamically, that's not the case. I need pure css. – Max Grass Mar 20 '13 at 14:14
    
@gr9zev Can't you generate the css class with it? Or is it that generic that it is completely unmanagable? – Rob Mar 20 '13 at 14:15
    
I cannot, it's being generated from complex 3d party. – Max Grass Mar 20 '13 at 14:16

Then could this not be just:

body > .xTable table tr td.xTable {STYLES}

????

share|improve this answer
    
No .xTable is a child of another. They descendants at a rather deeper level than that. – Quentin Mar 20 '13 at 14:19
    
all .xTable's have already their styles. Only the 2nd needs to be overridden, deeper level elements must not be affected. – Max Grass Mar 20 '13 at 14:20
    
See the edit above. – Michael Mar 20 '13 at 14:24
    
checking it right now – Max Grass Mar 20 '13 at 14:25
    
Be sure to replace body with whatever your container element is. – Michael Mar 20 '13 at 14:26

As you are saying that you can't add class name as provided by @Rob, then I think there is only one way to go with javascript or jquery. Below I provided solution using jQuery.

$('.xTable:eq(1)').css('backgroundColor','green'); //Selects the second .xTable class div

Check more about it here

share|improve this answer

When you use someelement someotherelement it is not important how much deep you go in the first element. But you can add a > between them to select only the someotherelement that is exactly the child of someelement like this: someelement > someotherelement and it will not select childs of childs of the first selector.

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Class composition is recommended. for example <div class="table level-2" />

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Using a :not selector to exclude the parent and then having a long list of child combinators might do the job:

:not(table) > .xTable > table > tr > td > .xTable

You might need to mix in the implicit tbody elements to that though.

A nicer solution would probably be:

.xTable .xTable {
    foo: bar;
}

.xTable .xTable .xTable {
    foo: Whatever it would have been if the previous selector didn't match
}
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