Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Consider the following scenario:

  • You have a module M defined in m.py containing a function f.

    It can be called like this:

    import M;
    M.f()
    
  • The module grows to a size where it is impractical to have in a single file. You split M up into submodules M.X, M.Y, M.Z and put the following in M/__init__.py:

    from .X import *
    from .Y import *
    from .Z import *
    
    __all__ = ["f"]
    

    The original code still works:

    import M;
    M.f()
    

However, new consumers of the code may mistakenly access the submodule directly:

import M.X;
M.X.f()

I would like to prevent this, such that all code is still consistently addressing M directly, and not any of the submodules.

The submodules are for the benefit of internal code organisation, and referencing M leaves the possibility of easy reorganisation in the future.

One option would be to name the submodules _X, _Y, and _Z to communicate that they are internal. Is that the recommended approach?

share|improve this question
4  
You don't. Why is that a problem? Your module still works, the code using those items still works. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 20 '13 at 14:20
    
I would like to prevent this, such that all code is still consistently addressing M directly, and not any of the submodules. The submodules are for the benefit of internal code organisation, and referencing M leaves the possibility of easy reorganisation in the future. (Question edited to include this detail.) –  Daniel Fortunov Mar 20 '13 at 14:23
3  
document the right way to do it and trust your user will be smart enough to follow your advise –  F.C. Mar 20 '13 at 14:24
2  
Then document the API the way you'd like it to be used. Anyone using the API the wrong way does so at their own peril. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 20 '13 at 14:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One option would be to name the submodules _X, _Y, and _Z to communicate that they are internal. Is that the recommended approach?

As you don't want people to access M.X, you will need to move the X.py module so it is no longer available as M.X. You could delete it as Kaie suggests, but ugh. Therefore yes, your suggestion is the recommended approach.

  1. Move M/X.py to M/_X.py

  2. In M/__init__.py have the line from ._X import f

As others have suggested, it shouldn't really be a problem that people can access the code and it's habits of programming in a language with stronger encapsulation seeping into your Python designs.

The submodules are for the benefit of internal code organisation, and referencing M leaves the possibility of easy reorganisation in the future.

Yes this is a concern I had when coming from C and C++ and dealing with ABIs all day. But it's often not an issue if the code is small and well tested enough. And this is the kind of thing that you can trivially fix later. If you one day decide to reorganize the code to have X as _X then I'm sure Jenkins can tell you what else needs to be updated. :)

share|improve this answer

There is a way, but I don't think you gonna like it:

# M/__init__.py

from .X import *
del X
__all__ = ["x"]

You can still do import M.X, but will throw Error when using it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.